SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. presents Little Dragon at Echostage
It is not an easy feat to remain relevant in an ever-changing music industry for almost 10 years, but somehow, Swedish electronic band Little Dragon has managed to do just that. Formed in 1996, the group has released four insanely successful albums that mix all the best elements of the electronic and rock genres. Originally formed in 1996 while the band members were still in high school, Little Dragon released its first EP in 2006 to critical acclaim.
Each of Little Dragon’s releases has received very positive reception and was complemented by extensive touring. In 2011, Little Dragon also supported Gorillaz on its immensely successful Escape to Plastic Beach Tour. The band’s headlining performances feature incredible light design, hypnotizing digital displays, and of course lead singer’s Yukimi Nagato’s bewitching vocals.

Little Dragon’s sound is distinctively electronic, but with splashes of pop and rock carefully threaded throughout. Personal favorites include the extremely danceable “Pretty Girls" and the raucous "Klapp Klapp,” both from the band’s latest release Nabuma Rubberband. The band’s synergy, something that only comes from years together, shines through on each track and the group’s distinctive sound is evident in each song. So, don’t miss Little Dragon’s unique brand of electronic music this Wednesday at Echostage!
-Janice Freeman

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. presents Little Dragon at Echostage

It is not an easy feat to remain relevant in an ever-changing music industry for almost 10 years, but somehow, Swedish electronic band Little Dragon has managed to do just that. Formed in 1996, the group has released four insanely successful albums that mix all the best elements of the electronic and rock genres. Originally formed in 1996 while the band members were still in high school, Little Dragon released its first EP in 2006 to critical acclaim.

Each of Little Dragon’s releases has received very positive reception and was complemented by extensive touring. In 2011, Little Dragon also supported Gorillaz on its immensely successful Escape to Plastic Beach Tour. The band’s headlining performances feature incredible light design, hypnotizing digital displays, and of course lead singer’s Yukimi Nagato’s bewitching vocals.

Little Dragon’s sound is distinctively electronic, but with splashes of pop and rock carefully threaded throughout. Personal favorites include the extremely danceable “Pretty Girls" and the raucous "Klapp Klapp,” both from the band’s latest release Nabuma Rubberband. The band’s synergy, something that only comes from years together, shines through on each track and the group’s distinctive sound is evident in each song. So, don’t miss Little Dragon’s unique brand of electronic music this Wednesday at Echostage!

-Janice Freeman

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 presents Lo-Fang at U Street Music Hall
Matthew Hemerlein, known to most as Lo-Fang, is bringing classical music to the indie rock world and we love it! After opening up for pop queen Lorde on her US tour earlier this year, Lo-Fang has been gaining attention for his smooth voice, sharp lyrics, and ability to play a myriad of instruments. The Columbia, Maryland native is classically trained in violin, cello, bass, piano, and guitar—he performs all the instrumentation on his debut, Blue Film. Hemerlein takes his old school skill set and expertly blends it with modern indie rock/electronic music, creating a sound that’s entirely his own.

Blue Film was recorded all over the world. From Cambodia, Bali, and London to his parents’ home in Maryland, the album was inspired by Hemerlein’s nomadic musings. His desire for wanderlust is directly translated to Blue Film as Hemerlein explores a musical genre that he’s crafted for himself. It also features two covers: a steamy version of Boy’s “Boris” and a haunting take on the Grease hit “You’re the One that I Want,” which both showcase Lo-Fang’s ability to turn any song into one of the coolest tunes you’ve ever heard. If you’re looking to celebrate Halloween in style this year, be sure to snag your tickets to see Lo-Fang perform at U Street Music Hall on October 31st!
-Kelly McDonald

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 presents Lo-Fang at U Street Music Hall

Matthew Hemerlein, known to most as Lo-Fang, is bringing classical music to the indie rock world and we love it! After opening up for pop queen Lorde on her US tour earlier this year, Lo-Fang has been gaining attention for his smooth voice, sharp lyrics, and ability to play a myriad of instruments. The Columbia, Maryland native is classically trained in violin, cello, bass, piano, and guitar—he performs all the instrumentation on his debut, Blue Film. Hemerlein takes his old school skill set and expertly blends it with modern indie rock/electronic music, creating a sound that’s entirely his own.

Blue Film was recorded all over the world. From Cambodia, Bali, and London to his parents’ home in Maryland, the album was inspired by Hemerlein’s nomadic musings. His desire for wanderlust is directly translated to Blue Film as Hemerlein explores a musical genre that he’s crafted for himself. It also features two covers: a steamy version of Boy’s “Boris” and a haunting take on the Grease hit “You’re the One that I Want,” which both showcase Lo-Fang’s ability to turn any song into one of the coolest tunes you’ve ever heard. If you’re looking to celebrate Halloween in style this year, be sure to snag your tickets to see Lo-Fang perform at U Street Music Hall on October 31st!

-Kelly McDonald

SHOW PREVIEW: Cloud Nothings at 9:30 Club
There isn’t a word strong enough to portray Cloud Nothings. What began as Dylan Baldi’s solo project in the basement of his parents’ house, has developed into something that every young adult in their twenties or thirties can submerse their soul into.
Turning On signifies the start of it all. There is a sense of honesty and genuineness that effortlessly streams through Dylan’s mouth with every word he sings. The production of the album is of a much lower quality than the three that follow, but it is more suiting to the band’s style. The grittiness and lo-fi characteristics that swarm Dylan’s vocals makes for thirteen tracks that create the meaning of realism. “You Are Opening” is an unbelievable track, and one that is underrated within the Cloud Nothings discography. From beginning to end, the musicality is so on point, it’s hard to fathom. The simple, repetitive bass kicks it off, which is quickly layered with a twangy guitar melody and Dylan groaning. One of the most beautiful qualities of his vocal style is how he can turn a simple sound into something painful and raw. As he repeatedly sings, “I don’t care why, I don’t care why you are opening,” he instills that suffering into his listeners.
There was a large jump in the journey between Turning On and the self-titled. Their sophomore album inherits more of punk-pop vibe, filled with energetic and insightful tracks. “Understand At All” is the album opener. While it has some pessimistic undertones, it is relatively upbeat. Everything after it slowly becomes deeper and darker. This will not hit you until the lyrical guitar line opens “Forget You All The Time,” debatably one of the best songs Dylan Baldi has ever written. (However, I am a bit biased; I credit this track with getting me through more obstacles than any other piece of music that has been a part of my life.) It’s hard to pick a favorite track on the album, because one after another will steal your heart away. 
Attack On Memory is the album that catapulted Cloud Nothings’ career, and developed their current musicality. By this point, the band has blossomed into a three-piece band with TJ Duke shredding the bass, and Jayson Gerycz on the drums. “No Future/No Past” could quite possibly be the most emotional start to any album; with all three members playing together, the timing of the instrumentation is impeccable from the haunting piano in the beginning up until the last time Dylan screams “No future, no past.” This transitions into another upper - th nine-minute ode to maturity, “Wasted Days.” The whole song revolves around the chorus, “I thought I would be more than this.” When the band performs it live, it’s a spiritual experience. Being in a room with hundreds of people all screaming that line, with sweat streaming down their face, can cause an out-of-body experience. “Fall In” will show you just how remarkable this band is.

There comes a point in our lives when we have absolutely no idea what we’re doing. There aren’t any signs pointing us in the direction that we should be headed; instead we have to some how figure it out on our own. At times it is excruciatingly painful, but thankfully there are moments of sheer clarity where everything falls exactly into place. Here and Nowhere Else embodies this feeling to perfection. Silencing any doubts, the album picks up right where Attack On Memory left off, blessing the world with another near-perfect album.
“Now Hear In” makes this obvious right from the beginning. Beautiful, reverbed guitar-goodness opens the track. As the song gradually gains speed and Baldi’s vocals edge closer and closer to his unmistakable scream, the drums suddenly cut out leaving us with, “We’re moving closer to the sun, I feel there’s nothing left to say. A simple life can be so strange.” This is what makes Cloud Nothings’ music so enjoyable: their ability to move and play together, one rising as the others fall. They are truly musical geniuses. The chorus of “Quieter Today” is one of the best the band has written. There is a brief pause right before the chorus begins jolting the melody to a slower tempo, which gradually returns to its original speed.
The emotion is exploding out of all eight tracks on the album and it will absorb you, as evident in “Giving Into Seeing” as Baldi repetitively screams “swallow.” Some may feel indifferent about his vocals, but the screaming is actually tasteful and serves as an extension of his emotions. Something could be said about every song on the album; each one is as important as the next with the first single of the album, “I’m Not Part Of Me,” serving as the perfect conclusion. You can listen to this album in your darkest hour or during your most joyful moments. Regardless, this album will make sense to you.

This Saturday, Cloud Nothings will take the 9:30 stage. If at some point in your life you have gone through a time of suffering, take the night off, and let someone speak the words you have been trying to admit to yourself. They are one of the most honest and talented bands existing today, and they will make your heart feel complete again (after tearing it apart.)
-Katie Cheyne
See Cloud Nothings at 9:30 Club this Saturday, October 4!

SHOW PREVIEW: Cloud Nothings at 9:30 Club

There isn’t a word strong enough to portray Cloud Nothings. What began as Dylan Baldi’s solo project in the basement of his parents’ house, has developed into something that every young adult in their twenties or thirties can submerse their soul into.

Turning On signifies the start of it all. There is a sense of honesty and genuineness that effortlessly streams through Dylan’s mouth with every word he sings. The production of the album is of a much lower quality than the three that follow, but it is more suiting to the band’s style. The grittiness and lo-fi characteristics that swarm Dylan’s vocals makes for thirteen tracks that create the meaning of realism. “You Are Opening” is an unbelievable track, and one that is underrated within the Cloud Nothings discography. From beginning to end, the musicality is so on point, it’s hard to fathom. The simple, repetitive bass kicks it off, which is quickly layered with a twangy guitar melody and Dylan groaning. One of the most beautiful qualities of his vocal style is how he can turn a simple sound into something painful and raw. As he repeatedly sings, “I don’t care why, I don’t care why you are opening,” he instills that suffering into his listeners.

There was a large jump in the journey between Turning On and the self-titled. Their sophomore album inherits more of punk-pop vibe, filled with energetic and insightful tracks. “Understand At All” is the album opener. While it has some pessimistic undertones, it is relatively upbeat. Everything after it slowly becomes deeper and darker. This will not hit you until the lyrical guitar line opens “Forget You All The Time,” debatably one of the best songs Dylan Baldi has ever written. (However, I am a bit biased; I credit this track with getting me through more obstacles than any other piece of music that has been a part of my life.) It’s hard to pick a favorite track on the album, because one after another will steal your heart away. 

Attack On Memory is the album that catapulted Cloud Nothings’ career, and developed their current musicality. By this point, the band has blossomed into a three-piece band with TJ Duke shredding the bass, and Jayson Gerycz on the drums. “No Future/No Past” could quite possibly be the most emotional start to any album; with all three members playing together, the timing of the instrumentation is impeccable from the haunting piano in the beginning up until the last time Dylan screams “No future, no past.” This transitions into another upper - th nine-minute ode to maturity, “Wasted Days.” The whole song revolves around the chorus, “I thought I would be more than this.” When the band performs it live, it’s a spiritual experience. Being in a room with hundreds of people all screaming that line, with sweat streaming down their face, can cause an out-of-body experience. “Fall In” will show you just how remarkable this band is.

There comes a point in our lives when we have absolutely no idea what we’re doing. There aren’t any signs pointing us in the direction that we should be headed; instead we have to some how figure it out on our own. At times it is excruciatingly painful, but thankfully there are moments of sheer clarity where everything falls exactly into place. Here and Nowhere Else embodies this feeling to perfection. Silencing any doubts, the album picks up right where Attack On Memory left off, blessing the world with another near-perfect album.

“Now Hear In” makes this obvious right from the beginning. Beautiful, reverbed guitar-goodness opens the track. As the song gradually gains speed and Baldi’s vocals edge closer and closer to his unmistakable scream, the drums suddenly cut out leaving us with, “We’re moving closer to the sun, I feel there’s nothing left to say. A simple life can be so strange.” This is what makes Cloud Nothings’ music so enjoyable: their ability to move and play together, one rising as the others fall. They are truly musical geniuses. The chorus of “Quieter Today” is one of the best the band has written. There is a brief pause right before the chorus begins jolting the melody to a slower tempo, which gradually returns to its original speed.

The emotion is exploding out of all eight tracks on the album and it will absorb you, as evident in “Giving Into Seeing” as Baldi repetitively screams “swallow.” Some may feel indifferent about his vocals, but the screaming is actually tasteful and serves as an extension of his emotions. Something could be said about every song on the album; each one is as important as the next with the first single of the album, “I’m Not Part Of Me,” serving as the perfect conclusion. You can listen to this album in your darkest hour or during your most joyful moments. Regardless, this album will make sense to you.

This Saturday, Cloud Nothings will take the 9:30 stage. If at some point in your life you have gone through a time of suffering, take the night off, and let someone speak the words you have been trying to admit to yourself. They are one of the most honest and talented bands existing today, and they will make your heart feel complete again (after tearing it apart.)

-Katie Cheyne

See Cloud Nothings at 9:30 Club this Saturday, October 4!

SHOW PREVIEW: The Head and the Heart at DAR Constitution Hall
With two crazy-successful albums and tours with bands like Vampire Weekend and Dr. Dog under their belt, it’s hard to deny that The Head and the Heart have taken the music world by storm over the past five years. The six-piece indie-folk band from Seattle, Washington has been producing incredible tunes since 2009, when the members met at open-mic nights in the city. Since then, the group has toured relentlessly, bringing gorgeous acoustic songs to captivated audiences around the world.
The Head and the Heart’s music is written beautifully and the group’s impeccable harmonies elevate the lyrics even higher. Hits like “Rivers and Roads” from the band’s 2010 self-titled album exemplify the group’s Americana leanings and their talent for seamlessly blending their voices and instrumentals. “Shake” from 2013’s Let’s Be Still is a foot-stomping, upbeat tune that demonstrates The Head and the Heart’s incredible musical range. Whether they’re singing about lost love or lifelong friendship, each track is imbued with a spirit that makes their songs instantly recognizable.
As beautiful as The Head and the Heart’s music may be streaming through your earphones, nothing compares, my friends, to seeing this group perform live. Something about smooth violins melding with acoustic guitars and soaring harmonies makes their live performance a true, life-changing experience. So, don’t wait, and get yourself to the beautiful DAR Constitution Hall this December.
-Janice Freeman
Get tickets to The Head and the Heart at DAR Constitution Hall on December 9!

SHOW PREVIEW: The Head and the Heart at DAR Constitution Hall

With two crazy-successful albums and tours with bands like Vampire Weekend and Dr. Dog under their belt, it’s hard to deny that The Head and the Heart have taken the music world by storm over the past five years. The six-piece indie-folk band from Seattle, Washington has been producing incredible tunes since 2009, when the members met at open-mic nights in the city. Since then, the group has toured relentlessly, bringing gorgeous acoustic songs to captivated audiences around the world.

The Head and the Heart’s music is written beautifully and the group’s impeccable harmonies elevate the lyrics even higher. Hits like “Rivers and Roads” from the band’s 2010 self-titled album exemplify the group’s Americana leanings and their talent for seamlessly blending their voices and instrumentals. “Shake” from 2013’s Let’s Be Still is a foot-stomping, upbeat tune that demonstrates The Head and the Heart’s incredible musical range. Whether they’re singing about lost love or lifelong friendship, each track is imbued with a spirit that makes their songs instantly recognizable.

As beautiful as The Head and the Heart’s music may be streaming through your earphones, nothing compares, my friends, to seeing this group perform live. Something about smooth violins melding with acoustic guitars and soaring harmonies makes their live performance a true, life-changing experience. So, don’t wait, and get yourself to the beautiful DAR Constitution Hall this December.

-Janice Freeman

Get tickets to The Head and the Heart at DAR Constitution Hall on December 9!

SHOW PREVIEW: An Acoustic Evening with Airborne Toxic Event at Lincoln
For nearly a decade, The Airborne Toxic Event have been hitting us right in the feels with passionate, literary lyrics and rocky, orchestral arrangements. From their first shows in 2006 to last year’s Such Hot Blood, the Los Angeles alt. rockers have established themselves as one of the most inventive bands of the 2000s. With a newly-signed Epic Records deal and fourth album on the way, Mikel Jollett and co. will undoubtedly wow us (and make us reach for the tissue) yet again.
While all Airborne Toxic concerts are religious experiences, the band’s upcoming acoustic show (the only on their current tour) at Lincoln Theatre will be next-level heavenly. Just imagine - stripped down versions of “Sometime Around Midnight” and “The Storm” reverberating through Lincoln’s historic hall? Chill-inducing. Even if you have tickets to Airborne’s sold out Club show the following week, this once-in-a-lifetime show is not to be missed.
-Madelyn Dutt
Spend an acoustic evening with Airborne Toxic Event on October 2 at Lincoln Theatre!

SHOW PREVIEW: An Acoustic Evening with Airborne Toxic Event at Lincoln

For nearly a decade, The Airborne Toxic Event have been hitting us right in the feels with passionate, literary lyrics and rocky, orchestral arrangements. From their first shows in 2006 to last year’s Such Hot Blood, the Los Angeles alt. rockers have established themselves as one of the most inventive bands of the 2000s. With a newly-signed Epic Records deal and fourth album on the way, Mikel Jollett and co. will undoubtedly wow us (and make us reach for the tissue) yet again.

While all Airborne Toxic concerts are religious experiences, the band’s upcoming acoustic show (the only on their current tour) at Lincoln Theatre will be next-level heavenly. Just imagine - stripped down versions of “Sometime Around Midnight” and “The Storm” reverberating through Lincoln’s historic hall? Chill-inducing. Even if you have tickets to Airborne’s sold out Club show the following week, this once-in-a-lifetime show is not to be missed.

-Madelyn Dutt

Spend an acoustic evening with Airborne Toxic Event on October 2 at Lincoln Theatre!

SHOW PREVIEW: Hozier at Lincoln Theatre
Think about this: just five years ago, Andrew Hozier-Byrne, better known as Hozier, was a student at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. Crazy, right? Fast-forward to 2014 and his hit single “Take Me to Church” has charted in 9 countries, and the singer is about to embark on a sold-out, worldwide tour. Audiences simply cannot get enough of Hozier’s deep, unique voice and incredibly moving lyrics.
Hozier’s first EP, Take Me to Church, contains four songs, including an awesome live version of “Cherry Wine.” The title track, however, is the song that launched Hozier’s career. The track went absolutely viral on Youtube. In less than two weeks, the video gained over 230,000 views and it now stands at over 10 million. Hozier’s newest single, “From Eden,” from his second EP is already finding success and continues to show off the singer’s lyrical ability and incredible vocal talents. After these two stunning releases, you can bet everyone is excited to get the singer’s first full-length album (to be released October 7).

If you couldn’t get your hands on tickets for Hozier’s show at the Club this November, don’t miss out again! The amazing musician is returning to DC for a show at the historic Lincoln Theatre next March.
-Janice Freeman
Tickets for Hozier at Lincoln Theatre on March 9, 2015 go on sale Friday, September 26 at 10am!

SHOW PREVIEW: Hozier at Lincoln Theatre

Think about this: just five years ago, Andrew Hozier-Byrne, better known as Hozier, was a student at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. Crazy, right? Fast-forward to 2014 and his hit single “Take Me to Church” has charted in 9 countries, and the singer is about to embark on a sold-out, worldwide tour. Audiences simply cannot get enough of Hozier’s deep, unique voice and incredibly moving lyrics.

Hozier’s first EP, Take Me to Church, contains four songs, including an awesome live version of “Cherry Wine.” The title track, however, is the song that launched Hozier’s career. The track went absolutely viral on Youtube. In less than two weeks, the video gained over 230,000 views and it now stands at over 10 million. Hozier’s newest single, “From Eden,” from his second EP is already finding success and continues to show off the singer’s lyrical ability and incredible vocal talents. After these two stunning releases, you can bet everyone is excited to get the singer’s first full-length album (to be released October 7).

If you couldn’t get your hands on tickets for Hozier’s show at the Club this November, don’t miss out again! The amazing musician is returning to DC for a show at the historic Lincoln Theatre next March.

-Janice Freeman

Tickets for Hozier at Lincoln Theatre on March 9, 2015 go on sale Friday, September 26 at 10am!

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 Presents Sondre Lerche at U Street Music Hall
Norwegian darling Sondre Lerche releases Please tomorrow, September 23. It is Lerche’s first collection of brand new songs since his 2011 eponymous album. And just three days later, he’ll be in town for a show at U Street Music Hall.
The singer-songwriter has been professionally recording for 14 years now. He was discovered as a Bergen teen, playing underage in a club where his older sister worked. He completed his debut LP, Faces Down, in 2000, but the release was delayed until 2001 in Norway so that he could finish high school. The record did not reach the States until 2002, where it was noticed. Six albums later, Lerche has maintained comfortable popularity worldwide.
Lerche is a melody-maker; a master of arrangements. He has a firm grasp of sounds, effortlessly moving throughout genres. Classifying his music is so easy, it’s hard. His cherished A-ha, Elvis Costello, and bossa nova can be heard all at once. The lyrics are quirky - at times amusing in their simplicity and flatness - an endearing quality that can be found only in the English of a foreigner. 
Slight of build, Lerche still possesses, in essence, the exact same doe-eyed-face of his 17 year old self. He is particularly beloved in his home country and recently appeared on a Norwegian postage stamp, looking like a cosmonaut. Actually, he always somewhat looks like a cosmonaut, a Soviet one—think Yuri Gagarin—bright, calm, earnest.
As Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks is often referred to as his “divorce album,” so we have Lerche’s. After 7 years of marriage, Lerche and actress/model/director Mona Fastvold quietly divorced in 2013. (They met when she appeared as “The Girl” in the music video to accompany “Days That Are Over,” off Two Way Monologue.) His label, on which Please will appear, is (still) called Mona Records. 
The first single, “Bad Law,” is uncharacteristically biting. Hear him sing-song-sneer the lyrics of the electro-dance track, alongside a fuzzy guitar. It’s fun! But almost not quite. The accompanying video features a sloppy Lerche terrorizing his way through a party - tearing down streamers, gulping liquor from the bottle, dancing like a fool possessed - and was apparently based on actual events. Check it out; he gives one hell of a performance.
Making music half his life, Lerche has remained ostensibly inoffensive, charming, profanity-free. At the risk of sounding crass, let’s look forward to some edge from this handsome boy-wonder. 
-Ren Cooper
See Sondre Lerche on Friday, September 26 at U Street Music Hall!

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 Presents Sondre Lerche at U Street Music Hall

Norwegian darling Sondre Lerche releases Please tomorrow, September 23. It is Lerche’s first collection of brand new songs since his 2011 eponymous album. And just three days later, he’ll be in town for a show at U Street Music Hall.

The singer-songwriter has been professionally recording for 14 years now. He was discovered as a Bergen teen, playing underage in a club where his older sister worked. He completed his debut LP, Faces Down, in 2000, but the release was delayed until 2001 in Norway so that he could finish high school. The record did not reach the States until 2002, where it was noticed. Six albums later, Lerche has maintained comfortable popularity worldwide.

Lerche is a melody-maker; a master of arrangements. He has a firm grasp of sounds, effortlessly moving throughout genres. Classifying his music is so easy, it’s hard. His cherished A-ha, Elvis Costello, and bossa nova can be heard all at once. The lyrics are quirky - at times amusing in their simplicity and flatness - an endearing quality that can be found only in the English of a foreigner. 

Slight of build, Lerche still possesses, in essence, the exact same doe-eyed-face of his 17 year old self. He is particularly beloved in his home country and recently appeared on a Norwegian postage stamp, looking like a cosmonaut. Actually, he always somewhat looks like a cosmonaut, a Soviet one—think Yuri Gagarin—bright, calm, earnest.

As Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks is often referred to as his “divorce album,” so we have Lerche’s. After 7 years of marriage, Lerche and actress/model/director Mona Fastvold quietly divorced in 2013. (They met when she appeared as “The Girl” in the music video to accompany “Days That Are Over,” off Two Way Monologue.) His label, on which Please will appear, is (still) called Mona Records. 

The first single, “Bad Law,” is uncharacteristically biting. Hear him sing-song-sneer the lyrics of the electro-dance track, alongside a fuzzy guitar. It’s fun! But almost not quite. The accompanying video features a sloppy Lerche terrorizing his way through a party - tearing down streamers, gulping liquor from the bottle, dancing like a fool possessed - and was apparently based on actual events. Check it out; he gives one hell of a performance.

Making music half his life, Lerche has remained ostensibly inoffensive, charming, profanity-free. At the risk of sounding crass, let’s look forward to some edge from this handsome boy-wonder. 

-Ren Cooper

See Sondre Lerche on Friday, September 26 at U Street Music Hall!

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium 
Thanks to a certain band whose name sounds more like a family-owned soda shoppe, there are a ton of folk-ish bands on the airwaves right now. Not all of them are worth listening to. But First Aid Kit, a Swedish sister duo who do American roots music better than plenty of Americans, have released one of the year’s best in Stay Gold. From the train track rhythm of opening number “Silver Lining,” the sisters reaffirm their place as worthy inheritors of the spooky-sibling-harmonization tradition. Despite Johanna and Klara Söderberg resembling the cast of American Horror Story: Coven, their music is endlessly optimistic, even when it soaks in the regrets of the past. Their music is the perennial soundtrack to every Route 66 road trip, and to that scene in every indie movie where the protagonist Figures It All Out. 
-Kelsey Butterworth
Tickets for I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium go on sale Friday, September 19 at 10am!

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium 

Thanks to a certain band whose name sounds more like a family-owned soda shoppe, there are a ton of folk-ish bands on the airwaves right now. Not all of them are worth listening to. But First Aid Kit, a Swedish sister duo who do American roots music better than plenty of Americans, have released one of the year’s best in Stay Gold. From the train track rhythm of opening number “Silver Lining,” the sisters reaffirm their place as worthy inheritors of the spooky-sibling-harmonization tradition. Despite Johanna and Klara Söderberg resembling the cast of American Horror Story: Coven, their music is endlessly optimistic, even when it soaks in the regrets of the past. Their music is the perennial soundtrack to every Route 66 road trip, and to that scene in every indie movie where the protagonist Figures It All Out. 

-Kelsey Butterworth

Tickets for I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium go on sale Friday, September 19 at 10am!

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 Presents How to Dress Well at U Street Music Hall
If I told you that you could see a super critically acclaimed, crazy talented artist perform in a super intimate venue, would you be frickin’ pumped? Of course you would. Well, it must be your lucky day because awesomely talented singer, How to Dress Well, is coming for DC on Saturday.
Since beginning his music career in 2009 by posting free EPs on his blog, Tom Krell (aka How to Dress Well) has released three very well received studio albums. The artist’s complex sounds have earned the attention of the music review website, Pitchfork, which has designated each of How to Dress Well’s albums as “Best New Music.” Stereogum listed How to Dress Well as one of the “40 Best Bands of 2010” after the debut record, Love Remains,was released.

Sonically, How to Dress Well is one of the most layered and complex artists out there. Krell’s beautiful falsetto melds perfectly with his ambient-rock-meets-R&B sound. So, get ready for an incredible, moving, and beautiful performance and make sure to get yourself down to UHall on 9/20.
-Janice Freeman
See How to Dress Well at U Street Music Hall on Saturday, September 20!

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 Presents How to Dress Well at U Street Music Hall

If I told you that you could see a super critically acclaimed, crazy talented artist perform in a super intimate venue, would you be frickin’ pumped? Of course you would. Well, it must be your lucky day because awesomely talented singer, How to Dress Well, is coming for DC on Saturday.

Since beginning his music career in 2009 by posting free EPs on his blog, Tom Krell (aka How to Dress Well) has released three very well received studio albums. The artist’s complex sounds have earned the attention of the music review website, Pitchfork, which has designated each of How to Dress Well’s albums as “Best New Music.” Stereogum listed How to Dress Well as one of the “40 Best Bands of 2010” after the debut record, Love Remains,was released.

Sonically, How to Dress Well is one of the most layered and complex artists out there. Krell’s beautiful falsetto melds perfectly with his ambient-rock-meets-R&B sound. So, get ready for an incredible, moving, and beautiful performance and make sure to get yourself down to UHall on 9/20.

-Janice Freeman

See How to Dress Well at U Street Music Hall on Saturday, September 20!

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 Presents Generationals at U Street Music Hall 
If you’re like me and are trying to hang on to summer for as long as humanly possible, look no further than Generationals. Grant Widmer and Ted Joyner, the duo responsible for these old-school tunes, have nailed indie pop. The New Orleans natives have been friends since childhood and were members of The Eames Era until 2008, resulting in creative collaborations long before Generationals came to be. Post-The Eames Era, the two began making modern day indie rock songs infused with sunshine pop from the ‘60s and ‘70s under their new name. Tracks like “When They Fight, They Fight” and “Put a Light On” are bright, airy, and so incredibly catchy, you’ll happily be listening to the band on repeat to bring back that sweet summer nostalgia. 
The bands’ fourth studio album, Alix, will be released September 16th, so that gives you plenty of time to learn those tunes before they grace the U Hall stage! Catch Generationals at U Street Music Hall on October 11th. 
-Kelly McDonald

SHOW PREVIEW: 9:30 Presents Generationals at U Street Music Hall 

If you’re like me and are trying to hang on to summer for as long as humanly possible, look no further than Generationals. Grant Widmer and Ted Joyner, the duo responsible for these old-school tunes, have nailed indie pop. The New Orleans natives have been friends since childhood and were members of The Eames Era until 2008, resulting in creative collaborations long before Generationals came to be. Post-The Eames Era, the two began making modern day indie rock songs infused with sunshine pop from the ‘60s and ‘70s under their new name. Tracks like “When They Fight, They Fight” and “Put a Light On” are bright, airy, and so incredibly catchy, you’ll happily be listening to the band on repeat to bring back that sweet summer nostalgia. 

The bands’ fourth studio album, Alix, will be released September 16th, so that gives you plenty of time to learn those tunes before they grace the U Hall stage! Catch Generationals at U Street Music Hall on October 11th

-Kelly McDonald