9:30 INTERVIEW: Guster
Guster is a band on the move. They’ve been working on their seventh studio record, releasing numerous live albums, and getting ready for their very own retreat, Camp Guster, in the woods of Maine. The 9:30 Club sat down to talk Guster’s Luke Reynolds about the new album and what they’ve got in the works.
Asher [9:30]: First and foremost, Camp Guster, September 14th, sounds like it’s going to be great. You’re pulling a pretty bold move, keeping it very intimate, limiting the tickets. What is this, if not a music festival? What is the idea for Camp Guster?
Luke Reynolds [Guster]: Camp Guster is something the band’s been wanting to put together for quite a while. We’ve got a new record that’s coming out, and promotion for it, so we’re trying to think of ways to help turn fans on to the music and create a real experience. So holding something in Maine, where everyone could come together and be a family for three days, was the best way that could happen.
And you won’t just be playing up onstage – you’ll be hanging out, doing some archery with the people that are there.
Yeah, we’re gonna be paddleboarding, kayaking, art, hanging, cooking. Especially Maine in the summertime, it doesn’t get much better than that.
You have some dedicated fans by now, who you probably expect to make the trek up there.
Exactly. I’m the new guy in the band, I’ve only been with them for four years. These guys have been a band for twenty years; it’s pretty awesome seeing some familiar faces in the crowd. Especially in the first few rows, those are the diehards, you know, people who are teachers and spend all their teacher vacations traveling around, seeing music, friends we’ve gotten to know over the years. It’ll be cool. To put myself in a fan’s shoes, if one of my favorite bands was holding this really cool retreat in Maine, in the summer, something with no walls, between the hang and the band, that would be something I’d be really excited to experience. We’re hoping we can make it really cool and enjoyable for anyone who’s making the effort to come.
You guys have a fairly active community of people who tape your shows, and you’ve always been pretty gung-ho about that. Having tapers is usually something that goes along with the jam band community, more than what you guys do. Do you have any thoughts on that?
I mean, to be honest, technology has changed so much that I don’t feel like there’s that many tapers at a show anymore. What I think is important is that people get to hear the music; they should be able to hear any different version of whatever song they’re looking for. They should be able to find it quickly and easily, whether that’s a bootleg off the board, or an unreleased b-side. Whatever it takes for people to find music easily, that’s where it’s at these days. Like I said before, Guster’s been around for twenty years, so earlier on, when it was harder to trade music, live taping was a way for fans to spread music around the community. Nowadays, everyone’s got an iPhone, shooting videos and putting them on YouTube; it’s like the iPhone is the new taper.
Sure. So you want to make sure music comes out to everyone, for the right reasons. Does that kind of tie in to the new album and its connection to Pledge?
For one, our new record Every Motion, is the most exciting Guster record I’ve ever heard. Everyone is confident that this is the best music the band has made it its career. We’re very ready to share it. That said, we want to make it easy for people to engage in the music as early on as possible, so we use Pledge Music. We’ve already paid for the record ourselves; this is just a way for the long-term fans to support the band, champion the album, giving back and engaging them. For us, it was really just a rallying point to help turn fans on to the music. We’re really, really stoked about the new record. It feels like the most adventurous, spontaneous sound, very new, very exciting.
That’s great! We all heard “Long Night,” and it’s different. Guster has definitely made their own territory musically over their career, and “Long Night” isn’t just the comfort zone – it’s continually looking forward, trying new things. It sounds very fresh, very alive.
Thanks man. Yeah, everyone always wants to feel that you make a record because you have something to say. The way I think about it is that every time you make a record, it should be the last record you’re ever gonna make. So make it count. So for us, part of making it count was facing the fear, stepping out of our comfort zone, really experimenting in the studio. The producer that we worked with in the studio, Richard Swift, was a perfect fit for that. He’s very free. It was pretty unconventional, in terms of the recording process, compared to early Guster albums. This one was very spontaneous, the whole thing happened very fast, and it was directly through working with Richard Swift and the environment he helped us create.

It shows a lot of focus, especially when you consider that this is Guster’s first new studio album in four years.
That’s the thing, man. I met these guys in 2003, over ten years ago, when we were recording across the hall from each other and we had the same booking agent. Keep It Together was my first with Guster, and then Ganging Up On The Sun was a new development, and Easy Wonderful felt real cool. I was joining the band, and felt real good about making new music, but a record takes a long time to write. We wrote it for almost three years, started writing it in the fall of 2011. It was a very long process, longer than we expected, but you can’t rush a record – all you can do is show up and keep chipping away. We just kept chipping away until we had a body of work we felt very confident about. Then we took that body of work and we brought it to the producer that was very inspiring to us, and worked it out very fast, not thinking too much. Not overthinking it was really good, and made it exciting to work that way with everyone.
It’s very cool that you’re continually moving forward, you know, with the new record, the multiple live albums, the Camp, you’re constantly busy. You’re not just resting on your laurels, which is very respectable.
Well, it’s like David Bowie always says, as musicians get older, the focus becomes more on finding ways to stay hungry, stay creative, and not live in comfortable territory. All of us have projects and lives outside of Guster, and we’re all creative people, and we all work really hard to fill up our lives, so when we get together to play music, we have something to say.
What are you all listening to these days? What are you listening to when you’re not listening to Guster?
We all listen to a lot of different music. There’s the FKA twigs record that just came out that I really like a lot. I was up in Vermont raising a barn this summer, and my girlfriend and I spent the whole summer listening to Deerhunter and Clams Casino. We wore those records out.
So you’re all over the place.
Sure. I listen to a lot of music, doing research about records, old bands, discovering music, learning about it… there’s a lot of listening constantly.
The day before Camp Guster, September 13th, is the show that we’re covering. It’s the Route 29 Revue, and you’re playing with a bunch of other artists – Trombone Shorty, Trampled By Turtles, a lot of big names next to yours. If you could share a bill with any artist, who would it be?
You mean at this festival?
Any festival, any time in the world, ever.
If I could put a festival together, it’d be with bands I was excited to see… Let’s see, Stephen Reich would be really exciting to play with, Thurston Moore, I would love to play a festival with him. Beyonce, that would be rad. Why not, dude? And then the Cocteau Twins. That sounds like a pretty great festival to me.
I mean, I would go!
[Laughs.] Me too, man, let’s do it!
So when the album comes out, will there be a support tour?
Yeah, man, I’m looking at our tour schedule and getting scared, I mean, we’re gonna be gone, not coming home for a long time. North America, Europe, we’re gonna be working really hard.
It shows. It’s coming out great.
Thanks, man. Thanks for taking the time. I’ll see you at the Revue!
-Asher Meerovich (@Bummertime)
Guster plays the Route 29 Revue at Merriweather Post Pavilion on Saturday, September 13th, along with Trampled By Turtles, Trombone Shorty, and Iron & Wine. Get tickets here!

9:30 INTERVIEW: Guster

Guster is a band on the move. They’ve been working on their seventh studio record, releasing numerous live albums, and getting ready for their very own retreat, Camp Guster, in the woods of Maine. The 9:30 Club sat down to talk Guster’s Luke Reynolds about the new album and what they’ve got in the works.

Asher [9:30]: First and foremost, Camp Guster, September 14th, sounds like it’s going to be great. You’re pulling a pretty bold move, keeping it very intimate, limiting the tickets. What is this, if not a music festival? What is the idea for Camp Guster?

Luke Reynolds [Guster]: Camp Guster is something the band’s been wanting to put together for quite a while. We’ve got a new record that’s coming out, and promotion for it, so we’re trying to think of ways to help turn fans on to the music and create a real experience. So holding something in Maine, where everyone could come together and be a family for three days, was the best way that could happen.

And you won’t just be playing up onstage – you’ll be hanging out, doing some archery with the people that are there.

Yeah, we’re gonna be paddleboarding, kayaking, art, hanging, cooking. Especially Maine in the summertime, it doesn’t get much better than that.

You have some dedicated fans by now, who you probably expect to make the trek up there.

Exactly. I’m the new guy in the band, I’ve only been with them for four years. These guys have been a band for twenty years; it’s pretty awesome seeing some familiar faces in the crowd. Especially in the first few rows, those are the diehards, you know, people who are teachers and spend all their teacher vacations traveling around, seeing music, friends we’ve gotten to know over the years. It’ll be cool. To put myself in a fan’s shoes, if one of my favorite bands was holding this really cool retreat in Maine, in the summer, something with no walls, between the hang and the band, that would be something I’d be really excited to experience. We’re hoping we can make it really cool and enjoyable for anyone who’s making the effort to come.

You guys have a fairly active community of people who tape your shows, and you’ve always been pretty gung-ho about that. Having tapers is usually something that goes along with the jam band community, more than what you guys do. Do you have any thoughts on that?

I mean, to be honest, technology has changed so much that I don’t feel like there’s that many tapers at a show anymore. What I think is important is that people get to hear the music; they should be able to hear any different version of whatever song they’re looking for. They should be able to find it quickly and easily, whether that’s a bootleg off the board, or an unreleased b-side. Whatever it takes for people to find music easily, that’s where it’s at these days. Like I said before, Guster’s been around for twenty years, so earlier on, when it was harder to trade music, live taping was a way for fans to spread music around the community. Nowadays, everyone’s got an iPhone, shooting videos and putting them on YouTube; it’s like the iPhone is the new taper.

Sure. So you want to make sure music comes out to everyone, for the right reasons. Does that kind of tie in to the new album and its connection to Pledge?

For one, our new record Every Motion, is the most exciting Guster record I’ve ever heard. Everyone is confident that this is the best music the band has made it its career. We’re very ready to share it. That said, we want to make it easy for people to engage in the music as early on as possible, so we use Pledge Music. We’ve already paid for the record ourselves; this is just a way for the long-term fans to support the band, champion the album, giving back and engaging them. For us, it was really just a rallying point to help turn fans on to the music. We’re really, really stoked about the new record. It feels like the most adventurous, spontaneous sound, very new, very exciting.

That’s great! We all heard “Long Night,” and it’s different. Guster has definitely made their own territory musically over their career, and “Long Night” isn’t just the comfort zone – it’s continually looking forward, trying new things. It sounds very fresh, very alive.

Thanks man. Yeah, everyone always wants to feel that you make a record because you have something to say. The way I think about it is that every time you make a record, it should be the last record you’re ever gonna make. So make it count. So for us, part of making it count was facing the fear, stepping out of our comfort zone, really experimenting in the studio. The producer that we worked with in the studio, Richard Swift, was a perfect fit for that. He’s very free. It was pretty unconventional, in terms of the recording process, compared to early Guster albums. This one was very spontaneous, the whole thing happened very fast, and it was directly through working with Richard Swift and the environment he helped us create.

It shows a lot of focus, especially when you consider that this is Guster’s first new studio album in four years.

That’s the thing, man. I met these guys in 2003, over ten years ago, when we were recording across the hall from each other and we had the same booking agent. Keep It Together was my first with Guster, and then Ganging Up On The Sun was a new development, and Easy Wonderful felt real cool. I was joining the band, and felt real good about making new music, but a record takes a long time to write. We wrote it for almost three years, started writing it in the fall of 2011. It was a very long process, longer than we expected, but you can’t rush a record – all you can do is show up and keep chipping away. We just kept chipping away until we had a body of work we felt very confident about. Then we took that body of work and we brought it to the producer that was very inspiring to us, and worked it out very fast, not thinking too much. Not overthinking it was really good, and made it exciting to work that way with everyone.

It’s very cool that you’re continually moving forward, you know, with the new record, the multiple live albums, the Camp, you’re constantly busy. You’re not just resting on your laurels, which is very respectable.

Well, it’s like David Bowie always says, as musicians get older, the focus becomes more on finding ways to stay hungry, stay creative, and not live in comfortable territory. All of us have projects and lives outside of Guster, and we’re all creative people, and we all work really hard to fill up our lives, so when we get together to play music, we have something to say.

What are you all listening to these days? What are you listening to when you’re not listening to Guster?

We all listen to a lot of different music. There’s the FKA twigs record that just came out that I really like a lot. I was up in Vermont raising a barn this summer, and my girlfriend and I spent the whole summer listening to Deerhunter and Clams Casino. We wore those records out.

So you’re all over the place.

Sure. I listen to a lot of music, doing research about records, old bands, discovering music, learning about it… there’s a lot of listening constantly.

The day before Camp Guster, September 13th, is the show that we’re covering. It’s the Route 29 Revue, and you’re playing with a bunch of other artists – Trombone Shorty, Trampled By Turtles, a lot of big names next to yours. If you could share a bill with any artist, who would it be?

You mean at this festival?

Any festival, any time in the world, ever.

If I could put a festival together, it’d be with bands I was excited to see… Let’s see, Stephen Reich would be really exciting to play with, Thurston Moore, I would love to play a festival with him. Beyonce, that would be rad. Why not, dude? And then the Cocteau Twins. That sounds like a pretty great festival to me.

I mean, I would go!

[Laughs.] Me too, man, let’s do it!

So when the album comes out, will there be a support tour?

Yeah, man, I’m looking at our tour schedule and getting scared, I mean, we’re gonna be gone, not coming home for a long time. North America, Europe, we’re gonna be working really hard.

It shows. It’s coming out great.

Thanks, man. Thanks for taking the time. I’ll see you at the Revue!

-Asher Meerovich (@Bummertime)

Guster plays the Route 29 Revue at Merriweather Post Pavilion on Saturday, September 13th, along with Trampled By Turtles, Trombone Shorty, and Iron & Wine. Get tickets here!

9:30 VIDEO: Gardens & Villa

We sat down with Gardens & Villa…and by ‘sat down’ we mean trapped them in their dressing room to answer questions, because, well, we love them. Watch & spin that ‘Dunes’ record. You’re welcome.

'Dunes' is out NOW. Get it here.

Video shot and edited by Rick Gonzalez.

9:30 INTERVIEW: People Under The Stairs 

People Under The Stairs have been making self-produced hip-hop by their own standards and pushing the boundaries of experimental rap throughout their 17-year career. They’ve begun touring the US and Canada in support of their ninth album, 12 Step Program, which came out May 6.

Asher [9:30]:  You’re just starting your tour for 12 Step Program. What has the audience response been like so far?

Double K [People Under The Stairs]:  It’s been overwhelming. People are loving it; we’ve been selling out every show.

That’s no surprise. You’ve got some eager fans – the digital preorder of 12 Step Program sold out so fast that it crashed the server!

Yeah, I mean, that’s a good thing and a bad thing. It’s good because of the positive response, it’s bad because we’ve got to make sure everyone gets their product, you know?

You’ve adapted to the demands of the electronic music market, considering you started out making music before the Internet even existed. Has that been easy?

It’s a new day, for sure, with electronic music. We want to make music for everyone to listen to however they want, on CD, vinyl, iPod, we want people to be able to hear it. So we do whatever it takes.

How do you like to listen to music?

Vinyl. Definitely vinyl.

Is there still a future for hip-hop vinyl?

Yeah, absolutely, there’s a huge future for it. It’s coming back!

Tell me about 12 Step Program. Where did the name come from?

Well, our first album was The Next Step, then we had Stepfather, you know, it’s always about stepping forward for us. There’s twelve songs on the album, so the name just came to me. The idea is that we provide a program to get people off of listening to whack music. It’s the methadone of hip-hop, to get people to stop listening to all the whack music out there.

Not to start a fight, but could you tell me who or what you mean by whack music?

Everything on the radio. That’s it. The ignorant, drug dealing, strip club music. You know, there’s nothing wrong with loving women, but that’s all they rap about. It’s just promotion of violence, sex, drugs, and this is what kids are listening to, and picking up that message – and that’s what major labels are selling and promoting! It’s whack.

So what’s the methadone?

Good old-fashioned honest hip-hop - scratching, turntables, just two MC’s going back and forth. It’s pure, it’s good times, and most importantly, it’s fun.

That’s a major reason that People Under The Stairs have kept such a great following over the years. People can tell on your records that you’re not just in it for the money, or the fame – you’re having fun up there. That’s what translates.

Exactly. We’ve always, always been about music first. We stand by quality.

That’s one of the strongest features you guys have kept up – you’ve always done your own thing, on your own terms, managing your music by yourselves. Does that carry over to your tours? Do you bring openers with you? Do you collaborate?

We just do our own thing. We get local openers for each show; we don’t collaborate with them or with anyone, really. We do things our own way. That’s what all the people on the radio do, just collaborate with one another. We work alone.

Do you think you’ll keep on making music as long as you can?

Til we get old and can’t walk. That’s all we’ve ever wanted to do, make music together, and we’re blessed to be in this position.

-Asher Meerovich

People Under The Stairs will perform at U Street Music Hall on June 10.

9:30 INTERVIEW: Gardens & Villa 

Ian [9:30]: For your most recent album Dunes, you decamped from your home of Santa Barbara to the wintery tundra of Michigan. What possessed you to relocate to what is essentially the polar opposite of your natural habitat to record this record?

Gardens & Villa: We wanted to get out of our comfort zone.. We wanted to be as far as possible from distractions and routine. Isolation and freedom to get weird without having the beach in your backyard.

I recently saw your show in DC at the club DC9. What would you say is the main difference between playing a smaller club like DC9 compared to 9:30 club which is about ten times as big? Also between opening a show and headlining?

So many differences, but it really depends on the particular club and the vibe of the audience. Sometimes small clubs have the most intense and vibrant energy. When you’re right in the crowds face and they are feeling it, it’s pretty incredible. But when you are in a large room like 9:30 club and the vibe is right, it can be just as intimate. It’s just harder to get that many people on the same wavelength, especially when you’re up on a high stage and not right there with everyone. The main difference between opening and headlining is, the people are either there solely to see you, or they are waiting for you to finish so that they can see the band they love, so opening can potentially be much worse. But sometimes, you can win over the crowd and it’s exhilarating. 

At said show you employed the use of two monitors with some very interesting visuals. What inspired these fantastical screens and who made them? What is the general mood you try to shoot for when it comes to the lights and imagery at your shows?

A wizard man named Bryan Berge put that together for us.. We had many pow-wows and inspirational tube watching/sharing ideas to get there. He is a good friend of ours and put together all of the initial footage. All of it was designed to reflect the images we felt the music suggested.

Secretly Canadian is currently one of my favorite music labels. How did you end up on the label?

Richard Swift. The man who produced our first record brought us into the secret underworld.

One of my favorite bands for the last ten years or so now has been Cut Copy. Dunes was produced by Tim Goldsworthy and I feel like I can sense his aesthetic. What was it like working with him and what inspired the pairing?

It was pretty amazing working with Tim. He is a great guy and a high priest of sonics. The pairing came about after he emailed us and said he fell in love with our “wild honey pie” video of us playing orange blossom. We nerded out over Ruichi Sakamoto records over email and then we made a record.  

There seems to be more of an electronic feel to Dunes and it definitely makes me want to dance at times. How important is it for you to get your audience moving?

We LOVE when the audience moves! It’s not the end of the world if they aren’t—sometimes people just want to soak up the music and stand still—but It feels really good to see a crowd loosen up and move around. It’s an honor really. How often do people dance nowadays in America? When it really goes off, It makes you feel like Richard Simmons leading a wild aerobics class, which is pretty much one of the best feelings an American man can experience. 

One of the most beautiful songs off Dunes is “Chrysanthemums.” Can you divulge a little bit about what this song is all about and the inspiration behind it?

Thanks! I don’t like to reveal too much about the songs. I like to leave interpretations for the listener. But roughly the song is sort of about a time in Seattle that i experienced. Rain, a broken down red automobile, and some love.

I just recently heard “Colony Glen (Mark McGuire’s Road Chief Remix)” and my thought was, “Wow this takes this song, that has been my winter jam, right into spring.” How did this remix come about, what does Road Chief imply, and was this at all the intention?

No, but that is kind of amazing! We love it dearly and listened to it for the first time during a spring day in Paris in front of the Eiffel tower.

What are you all listening to right now that you guys are all about? I know it’s a pretty basic question but I feel like non-basic answers will come from it.

Right now this moment in Boston, we are listening SIRIUSMO. In our van we have all been really in to the new ANGEL OLSEN record and the new War On Drugs.. LOTS of medieval stuff..

I feel like y’all’s sound is in a constant state evolution, and I know that Dunes is relatively fresh, but have you given any thought at all to where Gardens and Villa is going next?

We think about the future constantly, mostly in hopes that music technology will become what we need it to be. In “the future” expect that we’ll be playing walls, couches, and lamps. Lots of sweet blinking red lights and some fog horns. Think 9th Century courting “the now.”

-Ian Signore

Gardens & Villa will open at 9:30 Club on Sunday, April 20 for Tycho.

9:30 INTERVIEW: White Laces

Mandy [9:30]: How’s the road? What state are you guys in right now?

White Laces: [Landis] Just crossed into New Mexico.

Cool! How’s the drive? You said you were driving over 1000 miles today.

[Landis] Yeah, we’re splitting it up into two days actually, where are we playing next? What’s the next city? Columbia, Missouri. So, we’re driving halfway there today, sleeping, and then driving A LOT more tomorrow.

That’s awesome. How’s the tour been, with The War On Drugs?

[Landis] Oh, it’s been amazing. They’ve been really great to us, and I mean, you know, their record is so huge right now, it’s been really amazing. You know, to go to every city, and see people go nuts over their set, and that sort of thing, it’s been really incredible.

Yeah, that’s awesome, we can’t wait for you guys to get here. Have you played D.C. before?

[Landis] Yeah actually, we played at Black Cat. I want to say, like last April or something.

Are you guys making any festival stops this summer?

[Landis] No, actually we’re in the middle of planning some of that stuff right now. We’ve been trying to like manage all our stuff while we’re on the road. So, we’re in the process of trying to figure some of those things out. But we’ve got some stuff we can’t announce yet, that will be out late summer and fall, that we’re pretty stoked about.

Awesome, we’ll be looking out for it. What about at home? Richmond has a really great music scene, what venues do you guys like to play there?

[Landis] Uh, in Richmond? We really like playing at Strange Matter, that’s a really good spot. And one of the owners actually tour managed for us, for a good chunk of the tour. Um, aside from that, Balliceaux is a really great place, we played there a bunch. And there’s Gallery 5. I don’t know, the city has a lot of really great spots. Even a lot of good house venues and kind of art spaces where they put on some really cool stuff. 

Yeah, definitely. So what music do you guys like to listen to? Am I crazy, or did I like detect some sort of post-punk influence on what I’ve heard from you?

[Landis] Oh no, there totally is. I think maybe less so on the new record, a little less post-punk. In the van, I don’t know, we listen to some weird stuff. What do we listen to in the van right now guys? I’m going to pass this to Dash and let him handle it. [Dash] This is Dash. I’ve been scoping out tapes everywhere we stop. We got a couple new age mixtapes from a place in Pittsburgh, we got a bootleg Brandy tape, some Missy Elliot, some Madonna, it’s been weird. 

Well that’s fun. What kind of music influences your music?

[Dash] Um, Landis is probably a better person to answer that question (laughs) [Landis] Oh, sorry, the influences? Sorry I just got the phone, this is Landis again. Man, I don’t know, at this point, we’re influences by a lot of stuff. We all team up in kind of a punk background, like our background’s punk, and like indie rock, except for Dash, who like came up with more like hip hop and a lot of electronic stuff. And so now that it’s, I don’t know, it’s a weird mix of stuff. We always are kind of switching around what we’re listening to and that sort of thing, so I don’t know how to pinpoint specific influences at this point, it’s sort of all over the place. 

Well that sort of makes sense, from Richmond. 

[Landis] And there’s definitely that kind of nervousness and energy from post-punk. 

Yeah, definitely, I detected that when I was listening to you. I see that you put out an EP last year, can we expect anything new in 2014?

[Landis] Yeah! We actually just finished a record in December with Jeff Zeigler up in Philadelphia at Uniform Recording, and got it mastered, and we got the final stuff in for that in the very beginning of March. So we’re hoping that’ll come out either in the summer or the fall. So, we’re really stoked on it. 

I’m sorry, with who?

[Landis] Oh, with Jeff Zeigler? He also did stuff with Kurt Vile, and Nothing, and also did the War On Drugs’ record as well. 

Oh well that’s exciting! 

[Landis] Yeah, it was a really great experience. And so, we finished the record, and literally, I think it was two weeks after we finished it, we got a call and got asked to do the entire War on Drugs tour. So, yeah, it’s been kind of surreal getting everything together. Figuring out, you know, all the stuff that we’ve had to do with this, but yeah, it’s been incredible. 

That’s great. And aside from any new recordings, what’s next for you guys?

[Landis] Yeah, absolutely, we’re really stoked on the new record. And we’re kind of excited to start working on new stuff too. We’re on a roll at this point, so… 

Well, that’s great! That’s all I really have for you today, but I appreciate you taking the time to talk to us, and we can’t wait to see you.

[Landis] Awesome. Yeah, I can’t wait to play there, we’re beyond stoked about it.

-Mandy Brownholtz

White Laces will perform live with The War On Drugs at the 9:30 Club on April 18.

9:30 INTERVIEW: Ricky Young, The Wild Feathers
[9:30] So you guys are getting ready to start the tour up at Stubb’s in Austin which is kind of like a home town show for you all right? You pumped?
[Ricky] Yeah, man. We’re excited, we’ve been on quite a bit of a vacation we had like a month off and in Nashville if you sit around a little too long, you get kind of stir crazy, so we’re ready. 
[9:30] I bet. Now as you guys get ready for the tour, which looks pretty extensive, what are a couple essentials that you have to have out on the road with you to make life bearable on the road?
[Ricky] Hmm I don’t know, do you mean packing or like musically?
[9:30]  Either or… let’s go with packing
[Ricky] Okay. Well it’s kind of funny, I pack pretty much everything I own, because you never know when you’re going to get the chance to do laundry! So I’d rather carry a huge suitcase and have clean clothes, then run the risk of not having anything at all.
[9:30] Right on. Now with you guys, having so many former lead singers and people from different bands coming together in one, I was interested what the songwriting process is like. If one person writes a song does that become their song to sing in a sense or is that something you guys always do collaboratively?
[Ricky] Yeah it’s kind of like that. I mean whoever kind of brings the idea to the table kind of holds the reigns and is the leader on that song more or less. Sometimes it’s just kind of bound together with no idea whatsoever, starting from scratch it all kind of depends. I mean we all write together, Joel and I write quite a bit and then if I have an idea that’s finished or halfway finished I can take it to them and we try to go from there. We can also sit down at a table and start from scratch and those tend to be a lot of fun because with 3 of doing it, it can be pretty easy and exciting to see all these ideas take on a life of their own when an hour ago they were nothing.
[9:30] Yeah, that’s interesting. One of the songs that really stuck out to me on the album was “Hard Times.” Would you mind telling us where that kind of came from?
[Ricky] Yeah, that’s actually a good example of the question before. We were in Austin and it was ACL Festival and we were kind of not knowing what was going on and we were in this situation where we had never toured.
[9:30] Oh was this after the Interscope issue? 
[Ricky] Yeah it was in between all that. So we were at ACL and we weren’t planning to be down there, but for some reason I had been at the festival seeing a couple friends and then walked back to Taylor’s house, and they had started the verse and chorus of that song and I thought it was great and I thought I had to get involved in there somehow you know? So I sat down and worked out the bridge and the lyrics, and we just kind of fine tuned it from there. So yeah that’s kind of a good example of how that all works, you know?
[9:30] Yeah, that’s very cool. I wanted to ask you as well – I have a trip to Nashville scheduled in about a month, any suggestions for me while down there?
[Ricky] Oh there’s so much there for a small town. The First thing I always do is go eat my favorite little Mexican taco place called Mas Tacos in East Nashville. I lived in East Nashville so that’s kind of my fun spot so there’s nice bars when I get home like 3 Crow, 5 Spot, and Edgefield, and those are kind of like the low key sit-and-have-a-conversation nice hangout bars. Obviously the whole Broadway Honky Tonk scene is pretty great, but I chose to do that during the day so it’s not super crowded, and there’s always music down there so it can be a lot of fun.
[9:30] Good to know! I’ll check some of those out. Now, when you guys come through DC is there anything you’re looking forward to doing here?
[Ricky] Oh yeah, we’ve always had such a good time in DC, especially at 9:30. We’ve been pretty lucky and have had lots of slots there – I mean we were always support, but we’ve been lucky with playing only sold out shows there, it seems kind of unfair, but that’s kind of the way it’s happened, so we love it man. We love that place.
[9:30] And we love having you guys, that’s great to hear. I’ve got one more question for you – if The Wild Feathers were to have their own cocktail what do you think would be in it?
[Ricky] Oh God. It would probably be – this isn’t going to make any sense, but it would probably just be a mix of things that we drink heavily. We’d have a lot of Miller Lite, throw in a lot of Jameson, a little bit of Jack Daniels, and maybe get some red wine in there and that’s pretty much it. I don’t know what you would call it.
[9:30] It Sounds Delicious
[Ricky] [laughs] It sounds Disgusting!
[9:30] It sounds like it would do the job!
[Ricky] Right!
[9:30] Alright man, well I appreciate your time. We’re really looking forward to the show here and hopefully we can have some of those drinks stashed in the dressing room for you when you get here.
[Ricky] Yeah, man. That sounds awesome. I appreciate it, man.
[9:30] Alright, man. Thanks a lot.
[Ricky] Have a great day.

[9:30] You too!

Performing LIVE at U Street Music Hall on February 4th! 
-John O’Connor

9:30 INTERVIEW: Ricky Young, The Wild Feathers

[9:30] So you guys are getting ready to start the tour up at Stubb’s in Austin which is kind of like a home town show for you all right? You pumped?

[Ricky] Yeah, man. We’re excited, we’ve been on quite a bit of a vacation we had like a month off and in Nashville if you sit around a little too long, you get kind of stir crazy, so we’re ready. 

[9:30] I bet. Now as you guys get ready for the tour, which looks pretty extensive, what are a couple essentials that you have to have out on the road with you to make life bearable on the road?

[Ricky] Hmm I don’t know, do you mean packing or like musically?

[9:30]  Either or… let’s go with packing

[Ricky] Okay. Well it’s kind of funny, I pack pretty much everything I own, because you never know when you’re going to get the chance to do laundry! So I’d rather carry a huge suitcase and have clean clothes, then run the risk of not having anything at all.

[9:30] Right on. Now with you guys, having so many former lead singers and people from different bands coming together in one, I was interested what the songwriting process is like. If one person writes a song does that become their song to sing in a sense or is that something you guys always do collaboratively?

[Ricky] Yeah it’s kind of like that. I mean whoever kind of brings the idea to the table kind of holds the reigns and is the leader on that song more or less. Sometimes it’s just kind of bound together with no idea whatsoever, starting from scratch it all kind of depends. I mean we all write together, Joel and I write quite a bit and then if I have an idea that’s finished or halfway finished I can take it to them and we try to go from there. We can also sit down at a table and start from scratch and those tend to be a lot of fun because with 3 of doing it, it can be pretty easy and exciting to see all these ideas take on a life of their own when an hour ago they were nothing.

[9:30] Yeah, that’s interesting. One of the songs that really stuck out to me on the album was “Hard Times.” Would you mind telling us where that kind of came from?

[Ricky] Yeah, that’s actually a good example of the question before. We were in Austin and it was ACL Festival and we were kind of not knowing what was going on and we were in this situation where we had never toured.

[9:30] Oh was this after the Interscope issue? 

[Ricky] Yeah it was in between all that. So we were at ACL and we weren’t planning to be down there, but for some reason I had been at the festival seeing a couple friends and then walked back to Taylor’s house, and they had started the verse and chorus of that song and I thought it was great and I thought I had to get involved in there somehow you know? So I sat down and worked out the bridge and the lyrics, and we just kind of fine tuned it from there. So yeah that’s kind of a good example of how that all works, you know?

[9:30] Yeah, that’s very cool. I wanted to ask you as well – I have a trip to Nashville scheduled in about a month, any suggestions for me while down there?

[Ricky] Oh there’s so much there for a small town. The First thing I always do is go eat my favorite little Mexican taco place called Mas Tacos in East Nashville. I lived in East Nashville so that’s kind of my fun spot so there’s nice bars when I get home like 3 Crow, 5 Spot, and Edgefield, and those are kind of like the low key sit-and-have-a-conversation nice hangout bars. Obviously the whole Broadway Honky Tonk scene is pretty great, but I chose to do that during the day so it’s not super crowded, and there’s always music down there so it can be a lot of fun.

[9:30] Good to know! I’ll check some of those out. Now, when you guys come through DC is there anything you’re looking forward to doing here?

[Ricky] Oh yeah, we’ve always had such a good time in DC, especially at 9:30. We’ve been pretty lucky and have had lots of slots there – I mean we were always support, but we’ve been lucky with playing only sold out shows there, it seems kind of unfair, but that’s kind of the way it’s happened, so we love it man. We love that place.

[9:30] And we love having you guys, that’s great to hear. I’ve got one more question for you – if The Wild Feathers were to have their own cocktail what do you think would be in it?

[Ricky] Oh God. It would probably be – this isn’t going to make any sense, but it would probably just be a mix of things that we drink heavily. We’d have a lot of Miller Lite, throw in a lot of Jameson, a little bit of Jack Daniels, and maybe get some red wine in there and that’s pretty much it. I don’t know what you would call it.

[9:30] It Sounds Delicious

[Ricky] [laughs] It sounds Disgusting!

[9:30] It sounds like it would do the job!

[Ricky] Right!

[9:30] Alright man, well I appreciate your time. We’re really looking forward to the show here and hopefully we can have some of those drinks stashed in the dressing room for you when you get here.

[Ricky] Yeah, man. That sounds awesome. I appreciate it, man.

[9:30] Alright, man. Thanks a lot.

[Ricky] Have a great day.

[9:30] You too!

Performing LIVE at U Street Music Hall on February 4th

-John O’Connor

9:30 INTERVIEW: Lissie
Kelly [9:30]: How’d you originally get involved in music? Where did you draw inspiration from when you first started writing and playing music?
[Lissie]: I intuitively started to hum and sing as a young kid. My mom would sing us lullabies and I liked that. Singing was soothing. My grandpa was a singer and we’d see him in local musical theatre productions and I wanted to do that! So I started group classes at 5 and would do little shows in town. I did musicals and then around 12 started voice lessons. About 15 I didn’t want to do musicals so much as teach myself guitar and start writing songs about my feelings! To express myself and sort through my emotions and experiences. It started like that and then I just stuck with it, writing songs and doing open mics and gigs, moving to LA at 21 and getting a record deal at 22.
Kelly [9:30]: You released Covered Up with Flowers, an EP full of covers, a couple years ago. How’d you go about choosing the songs you covered? And if you could collaborate with one of the artists you covered, whom would you choose?
[Lissie]: The band and I had been covering “Nothing Else Matters”, “Bad Romance”, and “Pursuit Of Happiness” live and had put up YouTube videos that were popular, so we wanted to release those and then just picked other songs we liked from different genres to record and picked the best ones! I’d love to work with Kid Cudi! 
Kelly [9:30]: What influenced the writing processes that lead to your newest album, Back to Forever?
[Lissie]: I was writing a lot for a year or more about my feelings and reflections on relationships. Also reactions to the news.  I was in a bit of both a clear more, well rounded headspace and a frustrated one so there’s some aggression to this album.
Kelly [9:30]: There’s a lot of fun stuff on your new album. Which is your favorite track from Back to Forever to perform live?
[Lissie]: Thank you! Further Away (Romance Police) is a blast to perform! 
Kelly [9:30]: What’s the last concert you went to as a spectator? What’d you like about it?
[Lissie]: The last concert I went to and really enjoyed was last summer. Phish. They’re such top musicians and the lights and the crowd and the vibe is just an entire experience! It’s like going to church!
Kelly [9:30]: What’s the craziest thing that’s happened to you on tour?

[Lissie]: I was trying to get to a festival in Norway and every flight was either cancelled or delayed from the start. I took like 5 planes to get there only to be stuck in Stavanger with no flight. The promoters sent a helicopter for me and I flew to the site over mountains and fjords for an hour to get there in time to just play 20 minutes of my set! Also my bags never showed up AND I had taken someone else’s MacBook Air at security, it turned out the person lived in Lebanon and had my computer so we were able to meet in London weeks later and swap! It was unbelievable! Everything that could go wrong did!  My bags came back to California like 2 weeks later! 
Lissie performs LIVE at 9:30 Club on November 24th with Kopecky Family Band.
-Kelly McDonald

9:30 INTERVIEW: Lissie

Kelly [9:30]: How’d you originally get involved in music? Where did you draw inspiration from when you first started writing and playing music?

[Lissie]: I intuitively started to hum and sing as a young kid. My mom would sing us lullabies and I liked that. Singing was soothing. My grandpa was a singer and we’d see him in local musical theatre productions and I wanted to do that! So I started group classes at 5 and would do little shows in town. I did musicals and then around 12 started voice lessons. About 15 I didn’t want to do musicals so much as teach myself guitar and start writing songs about my feelings! To express myself and sort through my emotions and experiences. It started like that and then I just stuck with it, writing songs and doing open mics and gigs, moving to LA at 21 and getting a record deal at 22.

Kelly [9:30]: You released Covered Up with Flowers, an EP full of covers, a couple years ago. How’d you go about choosing the songs you covered? And if you could collaborate with one of the artists you covered, whom would you choose?

[Lissie]: The band and I had been covering “Nothing Else Matters”, “Bad Romance”, and “Pursuit Of Happiness” live and had put up YouTube videos that were popular, so we wanted to release those and then just picked other songs we liked from different genres to record and picked the best ones! I’d love to work with Kid Cudi! 

Kelly [9:30]: What influenced the writing processes that lead to your newest album, Back to Forever?

[Lissie]: I was writing a lot for a year or more about my feelings and reflections on relationships. Also reactions to the news.  I was in a bit of both a clear more, well rounded headspace and a frustrated one so there’s some aggression to this album.

Kelly [9:30]: There’s a lot of fun stuff on your new album. Which is your favorite track from Back to Forever to perform live?

[Lissie]: Thank you! Further Away (Romance Police) is a blast to perform! 

Kelly [9:30]: What’s the last concert you went to as a spectator? What’d you like about it?

[Lissie]: The last concert I went to and really enjoyed was last summer. Phish. They’re such top musicians and the lights and the crowd and the vibe is just an entire experience! It’s like going to church!

Kelly [9:30]: What’s the craziest thing that’s happened to you on tour?

[Lissie]: I was trying to get to a festival in Norway and every flight was either cancelled or delayed from the start. I took like 5 planes to get there only to be stuck in Stavanger with no flight. The promoters sent a helicopter for me and I flew to the site over mountains and fjords for an hour to get there in time to just play 20 minutes of my set! Also my bags never showed up AND I had taken someone else’s MacBook Air at security, it turned out the person lived in Lebanon and had my computer so we were able to meet in London weeks later and swap! It was unbelievable! Everything that could go wrong did!  My bags came back to California like 2 weeks later! 

Lissie performs LIVE at 9:30 Club on November 24th with Kopecky Family Band.

-Kelly McDonald

9:30 INTERVIEW: Darren Weiss, PAPA

Johnathan Blair [9:30]: If you could describe your music in three words to someone who had never previously listened before - which would you choose?

Darren Weiss [PAPA]: American, romantic, soul 

JB [9:30]: Which artists have had the greatest influence on you musically? Which artists have had the greatest influence on your own mindset/persona/attitude with respect to performing live?

DW [PAPA]:The truth is, my influences are always changing intensely. I become completely obsessive over artists (musical, and otherwise) and for a time, really dedicate my whole mentality to trying live inside their work.  But I know that Leonard Cohen never seems to go away from me, and the Clash have always been really important to the way this band operates and communicates.  The artists who I’ve seen who’ve impacted my intentions the most as a performer (in the last 3 years) would be Patti Smith, Nick Cave, and Bruce Springsteen. These artists perform with such a sense of urgency, which in many ways is more important to me than passion or talent.  No matter what the tempo, dynamic, or genre, seeing these people perform left me feeling real electricity running through my veins.  Bruce Springsteen once said in an interview that he felt a performer should never expect anything from his or her audience, but instead should work to take the response that belongs to him.  I always think of that before we walk on stage.  In our band, we all came of age going to punk shows in Los Angeles.  The energy was the absolute most important thing I took away from those experiences.  Punk, above all, is an energy, and it’s always living inside what I do.  

JB [9:30]: You’re currently supporting Cold War Kids - did you all know each other before this tour? How did you connect? How are they as tour mates?   

DW [PAPA]:Yeah, we’ve been having a really cool time with these guys over the last few months.  We had never met before actually, but they’re great tour mates, and have become friends of ours.  

JB [9:30]: Which stop on tour are you most looking forward to? Any cities you have previously never played that you are excited about visiting?

DW [PAPA]: Well after we finish this east coast run with Cold War Kids, we’re stopping over in Iceland for a few days to play a festival before going to Europe.  None of us have ever been there, and it’s always exciting to bring our energy and our culture to a completely new place.  I can’t wait to see what that show is going to be like. 

JB [9:30]: Tender Madness has a much bigger sound to it cohesively than some of your previous work (A Good Woman Is Hard To Find). Do you attribute this to personal experiences? Or more of a natural development as you continued to play and record together?

DW [PAPA]: Both.  We definitely had more clear intentions when working on our full length.  The EP kind of came together, but for this record there were definite things I wanted to convey, portraits I wanted to illustrate, frustrations I needed to air.  We’ve also been touring and working as band together in a much more intense way since the release of our EP, so I think the combination of traveling together, seeing all kinds of things together, and through these experiences, knowing what we wanted, and more importantly, what we wanted to stay away from.  

JB [9:30]: Follow up - Is a good woman truly that hard to find? Have you finally found good women?

DW [PAPA]: A good woman is truly that hard to find.  But it’s not all on them.  The name of my book that just came out is “The Only Thing Worse Than A Woman Is A Man,”  so we’re all a little fucked up these days.  But yes, I have found a good woman.  So I’ll hold on tight.   

JB [9:30]: Drummers as singers - so rare! We love it, and it’s not a natural pairing. Which came first for you? Was there a sort of initial rehearsal period to combine the two without stumbling live - we can imagine that’s no easy feat.

DW [PAPA]: Drumming definitely came first.  I don’t even really consider myself a singer.  I only started singing because I was writing songs that wouldn’t make sense for other people to sing, so I sang them.  But when I first performed the early PAPA songs, I was going out as a solo folk kind of thing.  Just me and my acoustic guitar, and I’d stomp out the rhythms with my boots.  But I knew I wanted the music and the live set to be more electric, more kinetic.  I tried putting a couple line ups together with me and my guitar in front, but it just didn’t convey what I needed it to.  I’m much more a drummer than I am a guitar player, so just like I starting singing out of a feeling of necessity, I started drumming and singing out of necessity.  Once I started doing it, everything started falling into place.  It all made more sense to me.  But I definitely had to work hard to get it right.  I’m still working it out every night.  

JB [9:30]: Girls was a great band, we had the pleasure of hosting you all a few years back, and we were definitely to hear about the break up. It had a sound that was great, but also felt like it was still on the verge of really hitting its stride - While in comparison, even early tracks/recordings from PAPA seem incredibly tight and fully-realized. How has PAPA allowed you to explore your expression as an artist more completely? Did your time in Girls and collaborating with the members of that band influence this project at all?

DW [PAPA]: Thanks, yeah PAPA was actually first of three on that bill with No Bunny and Girls a few years ago, and we all remember it as a great night.  I will say that in Girls, I really was only a drummer.  I did not help Christopher with any songwriting.  But I did pay close attention, as I do anytime I work with an artist I respect.  I think working on recordings with Girls, and seeing the connection to the material live all across the globe did have a really important impact on my own song writing, with lyrics in particular.  It made me want to be more directly honest.  To be less fearful about being vulnerable. Even though I love instrumental music, and I love experimental music, and avant garde poetry, my experiences have made me realize the true power of an honest song, that speaks any truth clearly and proudly.  

JB [9:30]: The video for ‘Young Rut' is fantastic - a pair of pants falls in love with a shirt at a laundromat, and romance ensues. What was the inspiration behind this video or how did you come up with the concept? Was it your idea or the idea of a director?

DW [PAPA]: Thank you. This was the first video we’ve done where we accepted treatments from outside parties.  In the past, we’ve always come up with an aesthetic and concept, but for this one we were interested in hearing somebody else’s interpretation of the lyrics, so this time around, it was our director Norton who brought the right idea.  We’re really happy with the way it came out.   

JB [9:30]: While we are on the topic of videos, the video for ‘Put Me To Work' is also fantastic! At one point, you have lights in your beard, and are wielding a flaming axe - how much fun was that video to shoot? 

DW [PAPA]: When we we’re sitting around with our friend Jonathan Hausfater (the director of our first three videos) Danny and I each had one idea that was important for us.  I saw myself in overalls swinging a flaming axe, and Danny saw himself in a skeleton costume.  A lot of the time, that’s how things get done with us.  One image will set the spark for a creative onslaught.  

JB [9:30]: How excited are you to headline, for the second leg of your tour? How will your live set expand/vary from support to headlining shows?

DW [PAPA]: It’s always fun to go out and do our own shows.  Even when we don’t get to play to as many people, or in as nice of venues as when we’re opening shows, there is something we really love about taking the night to be our own.  There’s a sense of ownership there, and that means anything is possible, and it’s us to make it happen.   

PAPA support Cold War Kids on October 24th (SOLD OUT!) & October 25th.

Get hip! Grab a FREE DL from PAPA here

FROM THE VAULT: 9:30 Interview with Futurebirds

Sometimes you fall in love with how wonderful a band’s music is, and then you double fall in love when they are down to earth fun people. That was absolutely the case when Futurebirds rolled into our club, and let us crash their dressing room hang time pre-show to ask them questions and pet their really cute road dog.

Watch, enjoy, and listen to this delightful band from Athens, GA.

Hope we see these dudes again real soon.

9:30 INTERVIEW: Marky Ramone
Mandy [9:30]: You’ve had an extremely long, prolific career. I guess we should start at the beginning. What bands did you listen to when you were a teenager, just getting started as the drummer for Dust?
Marky: The Beatles, The Who, The Kinks, Jan and Dean, all the great Motown.
Mandy [9:30]: What eventually led you to become interested in punk music?
Marky: Everyone loves to label things and the term “punk” was the label given to the Ramones. Then everyone started trying to copy the sound and a genre was born.  
Mandy [9:30]: What do you think of the development of punk music after the Ramones? Any current bands that you’re into?
Marky: I don’t want to mention any particular band by name that I like  (or don’t like) but I will say no band comes close to the Ramones.
Mandy [9:30]: Among your own lengthy list of work, what stands out to you? Any favorite records or releases?
Marky: As a musician of course there are lots of songs that I really loved playing on but being in the film “Rock  n Roll High School” really stands out..
Mandy [9:30]: Tell me more about this current tour, Marky Ramone’s Blitzkrieg. How did you begin working with Andrew W.K.?
Marky: Well we will be playing  in our nation’s capital so all our lawmakers and President will have an opportunity to have some fun (just kidding). We’ll also be playing in Philly, Boston, Chicago, Seattle, S.F., L.A. and my hometown NYC. I met Andrew though a mutual friend and we thought it would be fun to play some shows together. We’ve already played in NYC, Russia, Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal and it was great.
Mandy [9:30]: What’s next for you after this tour?
Marky: I have  a deadline of December for Touchstone for my memoir so that’s what’s next…
Mandy [9:30]: Aside from your musical career, I see you’ve delved into the world of fashion, with your Tommy Hilfiger line, and food, with your line of pasta sauces. Can we expect similar ventures from you in the future?
Marky: Always something.

-Mandy Brownholtz
Marky Ramone’s Blitzkreig with Andrew W.K. on Vocals is LIVE at 9:30 Club on October 2nd. 

9:30 INTERVIEW: Marky Ramone

Mandy [9:30]: You’ve had an extremely long, prolific career. I guess we should start at the beginning. What bands did you listen to when you were a teenager, just getting started as the drummer for Dust?

Marky: The Beatles, The Who, The Kinks, Jan and Dean, all the great Motown.

Mandy [9:30]: What eventually led you to become interested in punk music?

Marky: Everyone loves to label things and the term “punk” was the label given to the Ramones. Then everyone started trying to copy the sound and a genre was born.  

Mandy [9:30]: What do you think of the development of punk music after the Ramones? Any current bands that you’re into?

Marky: I don’t want to mention any particular band by name that I like  (or don’t like) but I will say no band comes close to the Ramones.

Mandy [9:30]: Among your own lengthy list of work, what stands out to you? Any favorite records or releases?

Marky: As a musician of course there are lots of songs that I really loved playing on but being in the film “Rock  n Roll High School” really stands out..

Mandy [9:30]: Tell me more about this current tour, Marky Ramone’s Blitzkrieg. How did you begin working with Andrew W.K.?

Marky: Well we will be playing  in our nation’s capital so all our lawmakers and President will have an opportunity to have some fun (just kidding). We’ll also be playing in Philly, Boston, Chicago, Seattle, S.F., L.A. and my hometown NYC. I met Andrew though a mutual friend and we thought it would be fun to play some shows together. We’ve already played in NYC, Russia, Spain, Italy, Greece, Portugal and it was great.

Mandy [9:30]: What’s next for you after this tour?

Marky: I have  a deadline of December for Touchstone for my memoir so that’s what’s next…

Mandy [9:30]: Aside from your musical career, I see you’ve delved into the world of fashion, with your Tommy Hilfiger line, and food, with your line of pasta sauces. Can we expect similar ventures from you in the future?

Marky: Always something.

-Mandy Brownholtz

Marky Ramone’s Blitzkreig with Andrew W.K. on Vocals is LIVE at 9:30 Club on October 2nd