DC HAPPENING: Capitol Bacon Festival
There’s not much in this world we love more than music, but bacon’s definitely up there. Luckily for us, our partner Capitol Bacon Festival is blending the best of both the bacon and music worlds this Saturday, September 20!
Taking place at the Half Street Fairgrounds (near Nats Stadium), the Capitol Bacon Festival celebrates America’s favorite breakfast meat with a jam-packed day of cooking demos, bacon tastings, an eating competition, and much more. With a menu featuring 40,000+ bacon-loaded items, including candied bacon, bacon jerky, and bacon on a stick, this is truly the Bacon Lover’s Dream.
And who doesn’t love jammin’ while gettin’ their grub on? Regional bands Dale and the ZDubs, Warden, Chasing Verity, and others will be provide the perfect soundtrack for your love affair with all types of bacony goodness. 
Catch us between bacon bites at the 9:30 Club table, where we’ll be giving away tickets to 9:30 presents Stick Figure at U Street Music Hall, I.M.P. presents Beats Antique at Echostage, and Run the Jewels at 9:30 Club!

DC HAPPENING: Capitol Bacon Festival

There’s not much in this world we love more than music, but bacon’s definitely up there. Luckily for us, our partner Capitol Bacon Festival is blending the best of both the bacon and music worlds this Saturday, September 20!

Taking place at the Half Street Fairgrounds (near Nats Stadium), the Capitol Bacon Festival celebrates America’s favorite breakfast meat with a jam-packed day of cooking demos, bacon tastings, an eating competition, and much more. With a menu featuring 40,000+ bacon-loaded items, including candied bacon, bacon jerky, and bacon on a stick, this is truly the Bacon Lover’s Dream.

And who doesn’t love jammin’ while gettin’ their grub on? Regional bands Dale and the ZDubs, Warden, Chasing Verity, and others will be provide the perfect soundtrack for your love affair with all types of bacony goodness. 

Catch us between bacon bites at the 9:30 Club table, where we’ll be giving away tickets to 9:30 presents Stick Figure at U Street Music Hall, I.M.P. presents Beats Antique at Echostage, and Run the Jewels at 9:30 Club!

JOE’S JAZZY JAUNTS: Medeski Scofield Martin & Wood - Juice

The fusion quartet Medeski Scofield Martin & Wood are back this week with a new release, the oh-so-evocatively titled Juice. It’s a grab bag of funk, blues, Latin grooves, and the odd classic rock cover. This is the group’s third album together, though all the non-Scofield members have actually been playing together for several decades. At this point, they have a well-honed sound, one that is experimental but polished.

The record starts with the spirited “Sham Time,” a song by pop-friendly saxophonist Eddie Harris. The grease is laid on thick, as guitarist Scofield contributes a staccato figure that would please James Brown. He gets a dancing partner in John Medeski, who contributes peppy support on the organ.

“North London” has plenty of the usual jamming, but also sections that are big and eager to please. The title is a reference to the hometown of ‘60s group Dave Clark Five, and their sunniness can be heard here.

“Louis the Shoplifter” has an appropriate air of mischief to it. The Latin vibe is heavy, anchored by Billy Martin’s limber drumming. Medeski switches over to piano, employing his usual dissonant chords, but playing a bit more outside the beat.

The riff to “Louie Louie” can be heard at the beginning of “Juicy Lucy,” though it’s muted by an effect. Another quote seemingly pops up soon after, in the form of a synth swell that sounds much like the first note of The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again.”

A few tracks later, the group makes the borrowing explicit with its take on The Doors’ “Light My Fire.” Scofield plays the Jim Morrison role, using a clean but bluesy tone. Medeski doesn’t have to stretch too far, filling in the psychedelic keyboard template already present in the song. Scofield later slaps on the distortion and delivers rock star heroics, replete with wild bends and shredding.

The group threatens another cover on “Sunshine of Your Love,” though the elements of the Cream song are hard to make out. The song goes on for almost 11 minutes, riding a reggae feel filled with fragments of ideas. A bit of an original Clapton line will jump out for a second, before fading back into the mix.

The trifecta is completed on the final track, a version of Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are a Changin’.” Medeski puts things in a reverential mood with an organ hum, while Scofield picks out the melody. Dylan’s vocal line is fairly simple, so Scofield plays with dynamics and adds small digressions to make it more interesting. The style he uses is very reminiscent of Americana-jazz pioneer Bill Frisell.

The members of the group all bring distinct personal traits. Martin’s command of Latin rhythm keeps things from falling into a backbeat black hole. Medeski displays equal ability on his many keyboards, and can take a slightly different approach to each. Bassist Chris Wood is the steady one, but brings an active energy to his role. Scofield has a range of timbres, and can push things into the rock realm. Together, they make this album a diverse and unpredictable listen.

-Joe Ciccarello

THIS ONE TIME AT BANDCAMP: Volume 9

I haven’t spent a ton of time in other cities, but I have a feeling that I am a DC girl through and through. We have a thriving music scene, a beautiful city, and a diverse populace. I am a firm believer that there is a little bit of something for everyone in the nation’s capital.Undone Ep by LD-50’s

The LD-50s: The LD-50s are an awesome noise rock, shoegaze outfit out of northern Virginia. Considering their whole Undone EP was recorded in a bedroom using a Guitar Hero microphone, it has that lovely fuzzy quality that you come to cherish when you spend a lot of time on Bandcamp. It’s fast, it’s loud, and definitely mosh-worthy. If you like the LD-50s, you should also check out their other recording project called Shirt/Pants, which is more along the lines of garage punk than psychedelic shoegaze.
RIYL: Early Cloud Nothings
Favorite Track: “Undone”
Bad Brother by Two Inch Astronaut

Two Inch Astronaut: Two Inch Astronaut makes me want to run around and smash things in a true DC hardcore punk fashion. If Two Inch Astronaut had been around in the ’80s, they probably would have played at the old 9:30 Club on F St. But since that no longer exists, you can find them playing a lot of house shows in the area. Their full length, Bad Brother, comes to us courtesy of Exploding in Sound Records and is distributed by Dischord, so you know it has to be good. 
RIYL: Something between Yuck and Minor Threat
Favorite Track: “little short guy”
Slide To Unlock by Harness Flux

Harness Flux: I get Lou Reed/Velvet Underground vibes when I listen to Harness Flux’s newest single “Slide to Unlock.” Maybe the phrase “slide to unlock” is this generation’s “peel slowly and see.” Or maybe my Velvet Underground obsession is now clouding my judgment. Regardless of whether or not Harness Flux could have hung out in the Factory in a former life, you should know the facts. The music is the solo work of John Masters, who previously made music with the band Metropolitain during the ’00s garage rock surge. 
RIYL: Sonic Youth, Pavement
Favorite Track: “Slide to Unlock”
-Sydney Sanial

Suggestions or submissions for next week’s article? Send them to sydneysanial@gmail.com.

THIS ONE TIME AT BANDCAMP: Volume 9

I haven’t spent a ton of time in other cities, but I have a feeling that I am a DC girl through and through. We have a thriving music scene, a beautiful city, and a diverse populace. I am a firm believer that there is a little bit of something for everyone in the nation’s capital.


The LD-50s: The LD-50s are an awesome noise rock, shoegaze outfit out of northern Virginia. Considering their whole Undone EP was recorded in a bedroom using a Guitar Hero microphone, it has that lovely fuzzy quality that you come to cherish when you spend a lot of time on Bandcamp. It’s fast, it’s loud, and definitely mosh-worthy. If you like the LD-50s, you should also check out their other recording project called Shirt/Pants, which is more along the lines of garage punk than psychedelic shoegaze.

  • RIYL: Early Cloud Nothings
  • Favorite Track: “Undone”

Two Inch Astronaut: Two Inch Astronaut makes me want to run around and smash things in a true DC hardcore punk fashion. If Two Inch Astronaut had been around in the ’80s, they probably would have played at the old 9:30 Club on F St. But since that no longer exists, you can find them playing a lot of house shows in the area. Their full length, Bad Brother, comes to us courtesy of Exploding in Sound Records and is distributed by Dischord, so you know it has to be good.

  • RIYL: Something between Yuck and Minor Threat
  • Favorite Track: “little short guy”

Harness Flux: I get Lou Reed/Velvet Underground vibes when I listen to Harness Flux’s newest single “Slide to Unlock.” Maybe the phrase “slide to unlock” is this generation’s “peel slowly and see.” Or maybe my Velvet Underground obsession is now clouding my judgment. Regardless of whether or not Harness Flux could have hung out in the Factory in a former life, you should know the facts. The music is the solo work of John Masters, who previously made music with the band Metropolitain during the ’00s garage rock surge.

  • RIYL: Sonic Youth, Pavement
  • Favorite Track: “Slide to Unlock”

-Sydney Sanial

Suggestions or submissions for next week’s article? Send them to sydneysanial@gmail.com.

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium 
Thanks to a certain band whose name sounds more like a family-owned soda shoppe, there are a ton of folk-ish bands on the airwaves right now. Not all of them are worth listening to. But First Aid Kit, a Swedish sister duo who do American roots music better than plenty of Americans, have released one of the year’s best in Stay Gold. From the train track rhythm of opening number “Silver Lining,” the sisters reaffirm their place as worthy inheritors of the spooky-sibling-harmonization tradition. Despite Johanna and Klara Söderberg resembling the cast of American Horror Story: Coven, their music is endlessly optimistic, even when it soaks in the regrets of the past. Their music is the perennial soundtrack to every Route 66 road trip, and to that scene in every indie movie where the protagonist Figures It All Out. 
-Kelsey Butterworth
Tickets for I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium go on sale Friday, September 19 at 10am!

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium 

Thanks to a certain band whose name sounds more like a family-owned soda shoppe, there are a ton of folk-ish bands on the airwaves right now. Not all of them are worth listening to. But First Aid Kit, a Swedish sister duo who do American roots music better than plenty of Americans, have released one of the year’s best in Stay Gold. From the train track rhythm of opening number “Silver Lining,” the sisters reaffirm their place as worthy inheritors of the spooky-sibling-harmonization tradition. Despite Johanna and Klara Söderberg resembling the cast of American Horror Story: Coven, their music is endlessly optimistic, even when it soaks in the regrets of the past. Their music is the perennial soundtrack to every Route 66 road trip, and to that scene in every indie movie where the protagonist Figures It All Out. 

-Kelsey Butterworth

Tickets for I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium go on sale Friday, September 19 at 10am!

NEW TRACKS: Bass Drum of Death - “For Blood”

Bass Drum of Death’s newest track from their upcoming LP, Rip This, is called “For Blood.” This song will add a nice touch to the album since it differs from previously released tracks. In just a short, two and a half minutes, the song alternates between a pattern of rambunctious drums and guitar riffs, coupled with John Barrett’s addictive and catchy voice. The song not only continues to capture these southern guys’ classic sound of pure, vociferous rock, but adds depth by alternating between lyrics brooding about past hangovers and raucous instrumentals. 

-Lauren Rosalanko

ALBUM REVIEW: Moon Hooch - This Is Cave Music

The saxophone is an instrument capable of doing a lot of things, but it hasn’t really found its place in pop music. Too often, it gets pigeonholed into the realm of kitsch, which doesn’t exactly help its case for legitimacy. However, a group exists to return the instrument to its proper stature, and their name is Moon Hooch.

On their sophomore release, This is Cave Music, the trio serves up a set of tunes that easily fall into the “danceable” category. All have a great deal of energy behind them, though go further to an extreme than others. The core set of sounds is two saxophones and drums, but in some cases this is augmented with electronics or vocals.

The album starts with a bang on the punchy “No. 6.” After a count off, the two horns honk out a series of precisely calibrated riffs. Occasionally, they’ll venture up from the low end into a shriek. As the song moves along, one player handles the bass line while the other lets out a progressively more unhinged melody.

“Mountain Song” takes a different tack, putting emphasis on atmospherics. Saxophonist Mike Wilbur switches to vocals, mainly sticking to a relaxed croon. The rest of the texture is occupied by shimmering keyboard and a steady drumbeat, until a horn line finally enters a few minutes in.

On “EWI,” the group gives some love to a relative of the saxophone, the electronic wind instrument. Neither brass nor woodwind, this device is played in a similar manner but is actually a synthesizer. As a result, it fits right into the half-digital/half-acoustic swirl of noise the track becomes.

The final song, “Milk and Waffles,” has a mundane title, but the music itself is filled with drama. One horn bleats out a theme, with some assistance from a neat echo effect. Around this, the band moves from valley to peak and back again.

-Joe Ciccarello

CONTEST: Signed Copy of MØ’s No Mythologies to Follow
If you haven’t yet heard MØ’s No Mythologies to Follow, what are you waiting for?! The Danish singer-songwriter’s debut album is a twenty-song amalgamation of electronica, indie pop, and soul that keeps spirits high and smiles wide. As we found out at the energetic songstresses’ U Street Music Hall show earlier this year, songs like “Walk This Way” and “Don’t Wanna Dance” are even dancier live, which we didn’t think was possible!
Needless to say, we’re pumped to dance with MØ again this Monday at the Club and want to see you there! For your chance to win a pair of tickets to the show and this beautiful, signed copy of No Mythologies to Follow (the cover of which features MØ blowing a bubblegum bubble), do one of the following: 
Post an Instagram selfie of yourself blowing the biggest bubblegum bubble possible. Be sure to tag us (@930Club) and hashtag #MØ930.
Send a selfie of yourself blowing the biggest bubblegum bubble possible to contests@930.com.
Submit your entry by 6 pm on Friday, September 19 for your chance to dance! Get to blowin’ them bubbles!

CONTEST: Signed Copy of MØ’s No Mythologies to Follow

If you haven’t yet heard MØ’s No Mythologies to Follow, what are you waiting for?! The Danish singer-songwriter’s debut album is a twenty-song amalgamation of electronica, indie pop, and soul that keeps spirits high and smiles wide. As we found out at the energetic songstresses’ U Street Music Hall show earlier this year, songs like “Walk This Way” and “Don’t Wanna Dance” are even dancier live, which we didn’t think was possible!

Needless to say, we’re pumped to dance with MØ again this Monday at the Club and want to see you there! For your chance to win a pair of tickets to the show and this beautiful, signed copy of No Mythologies to Follow (the cover of which features MØ blowing a bubblegum bubble), do one of the following

  • Post an Instagram selfie of yourself blowing the biggest bubblegum bubble possible. Be sure to tag us (@930Club) and hashtag #MØ930.

  • Send a selfie of yourself blowing the biggest bubblegum bubble possible to contests@930.com.

Submit your entry by 6 pm on Friday, September 19 for your chance to dance! Get to blowin’ them bubbles!

AS HEARD ON TV: “Your Rocky Spine” - Great Lake Swimmers on Weeds

Because I thought that Mary Louise Parker was one of the best guest actors on The West Wing, I chose Weeds as my next binge-watching endeavor. Parker stars as a widowed, weed-dealing mom residing in a supposedly utopic suburban town, Agrestic. Under the surface of identical housing complexes, everyone who lives in Agrestic is an absolute mess. As the show progresses, Nancy Botwin (Parker) goes far beyond her humble beginnings as a small scale weed dealer and gets in all sorts of dangerous situations. An element I like about this show is that a lot of the criminals are actually likable human beings, despite the terrible things they do. This makes sense given that show producer, Jenji Kohan, would go on to create Orange is the New Black, which is full of criminals I’d want to get coffee with.

When U-Turn (what a name!), one of the endearing/severely dangerous drug dealers, dies on a mountain, “Your Rocky Spine” by Great Lake Swimmers starts playing softly. It was an ideal song for this moment in that the peacefulness of it reflected Nancy’s fake initial grief over his passing and more importantly her newfound freedom from being in debt to U-Turn. In addition to that, “Your Rocky Spine” is all about nature and “the shape that your body makes,” fitting in well with a dead drug dealer on a mountain peak. Weeds is all about putting up facades that no one in fact believes, so a smooth and slow-tempo group like Great Lake Swimmers is perfect for emulating those deeply rooted, false fronts.

-Emily Hirsch

ALBUM REVIEW: Generationals - Alix

I don’t know about you, but I have been mourning the end of summer since the first day I had to wear shoes that aren’t flip flops. The upcoming days of jackets, scarves, and piles of snow have me desperately trying to hold onto the carefree feeling of summer. Well, I guess New Orleans duo Generationals heard my prayers because their new album, Alix, is the perfect summer record.

Generationals’ Ted Joyner and Grant Widmer have perfected the art of indie-rock/electronic music and are definitely delivering on their new, fourth release. Alix shows off the duo’s vocal talents, particularly their smooth falsetto, and proves that these two know exactly how to craft the perfect track. Songs like “Welcome to the Fire” have a distinct ’80s vibe but still retain modernity, mostly due to the band’s vocals.

This record was produced by alt-rock superstar Richard Swift who has also worked with The Shins, Foxygen, and Guster. His influence can definitely be seen throughout the record with some Shins-esque beats on tracks like “Now Look At Me.”

So, if you’re like me and struggling to accept the end of sunshine and sand, make sure to send a thank-you to Generationals for providing a summery gem exactly when we need it most.

-Janice Freeman

See Generationals on Saturday, October 11 at U Street Music Hall!