NOSTALGIA MY MUSE: My Bloody Valentine - You Made Me Realise 

Before Loveless, My Bloody Valentine released a five-song EP by the name You Made Me Realise. Listening to this album is a spiritual experience. It inflicts a sense of uncertainty that is rare to find, but when it’s finally found, it’s almost impossible to decipher whether it’s an overwhelming feeling of joy or an overwhelming feeling of nostalgia and longing. Regardless, it’s a compelling piece of art that has the capacity to stretch the minds of listeners.

Since it was released in the late ’80s, You Made Me Realise is no longer being pressed on vinyl. Any copy currently being sold is priced at well over $100, meaning you’d basically be paying $25 per track, at the very least. This being said, it would be well worth every cent.

When listening to the release, it is necessary to take a deep breath before hitting the play button. As soon as you do, the pulsing guitar lines of the title track come bellowing through the speakers. It is the only way to start the album: with catastrophic and eardrum-destroying melodies that are so pertinent to My Bloody Valentine’s music. The track has been described as walking a fine line between experiencing “bliss and terror” - this goes without discrepancy. After Belinda Butcher and Kevin Shields simultaneously sing, “Wait for me because I waited for you / No that’s not what you should do / Don’t hate me ‘cause I don’t hate you,” they lead into the fuzz of the guitars cutting out, leaving them to sing the title of the track. This moment in the first chorus defines both bliss and terror flawlessly.

The second track is a change of pace, with the appropriate title of “Slow.” It offers relief after the opening track with simplistic vocals and a deep, low droning of the bass and guitars. By repeating the words “slow” and “smile” consistently after every phrase, MBV pretends that they can write an optimistic song.

My Bloody Valentine is an influential band within the genre of shoegaze; they prove why in every song they release through intricacies that are difficult to mimic. This is evident through the shrieking guitar that is distorted in just the right way during the halfway point of the album, “Thorn.” Also evident from this track, as well as in it’s precursor, is how MBV’s melodies sometimes suggest that a song is “happy.” However, once you focus on the lyrics, you realize it’s all a flawed perception.

“Cigarette In Your Bed” is one of the most underrated tracks within My Bloody Valentine’s discography; it is quintessential to defining the band. It’s hard to express how the song is perceived; it can only be felt. One afternoon when you are in a contemplative state and have some time to yourself (and access to a window), listen to this song. As you are sitting there looking out at the world, it will give you a whole new way of examining it and may even alter the perspective of yourself. It’s sheer brilliance.

After an exhausting journey of four, insightful tracks, “Drive It All Over Me” serves as an effortless conclusion: “Run run away run run away / ‘Cause there’s nothing left to say / Oh, the travel always gets me / Get in the car and drive it all over me.” The chorus aggregates the atmosphere of the entire album. Free your mind and find an escape; it is essential to devise a meaning. You Made Me Realise is sublime.

-Katie Cheyne

WE LOVE OUR PARTNERS: El Rey
Ahhh, El Rey…one of our favorite pre-show grub spots! The taqueria and Mexican beer garden, located a stone’s throw from the Club, Lincoln Theatre, and U Street Music Hall (where we sometimes present shows), is our go-to place on U Street for chowing down on outta-this-world tacos, tamales, and margaritas. That the restaurant’s made of shipping containers and has a retractable roof is an added ambiance bonus.
Tonight, El Rey’s offering a special, pre-show happy hour to Café Tacuba ticket-holders! If $5 margaritas, $3 PBR tallboys, and $3 tamales are up your alley (and why wouldn’t they be?), show your server your ticket, and all that (cheap) deliciousness is yours!
We don’t know about you guys, but we know where we’ll be tonight before celebrating Cafe Tacuba’s and Re's legacy!
Get tickets to Cafe Tacuba at Lincoln Theatre. 
El Rey is located at 919 U Street, NW.

WE LOVE OUR PARTNERS: El Rey

Ahhh, El Rey…one of our favorite pre-show grub spots! The taqueria and Mexican beer garden, located a stone’s throw from the Club, Lincoln Theatre, and U Street Music Hall (where we sometimes present shows), is our go-to place on U Street for chowing down on outta-this-world tacos, tamales, and margaritas. That the restaurant’s made of shipping containers and has a retractable roof is an added ambiance bonus.

Tonight, El Rey’s offering a special, pre-show happy hour to Café Tacuba ticket-holders! If $5 margaritas, $3 PBR tallboys, and $3 tamales are up your alley (and why wouldn’t they be?), show your server your ticket, and all that (cheap) deliciousness is yours!

We don’t know about you guys, but we know where we’ll be tonight before celebrating Cafe Tacuba’s and Re's legacy!

Get tickets to Cafe Tacuba at Lincoln Theatre. 

El Rey is located at 919 U Street, NW.

METADATA: Neil Young - “This Note’s For You”

The history of popular music is rife with artist feuds (Iggy and Snoop, anyone?). One of the snarkier ones to ever come about is Neil Young’s minor chord rocker “This Note’s For You.” Its music video is a scathing satire of Eric Clapton’s infamous Michelob commercial, part of a broader ad campaign entitled “This Bud’s For You” (get it?), which was widely considered a sellout move. The video mocks other perceived “corporate rockers” like Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson. Jackson’s legal team threatened MTV, keeping Young’s video off the airwaves…for a while.

The song namechecks brands Young refuses to sing for: Pepsi, Coke, Miller, Bud. Even politicians and potatoes aren’t allowed to touch his tunes. And this was pre-Napster. These days, the “rules” about bands selling their songs to advertisers are a bit more nebulous. In the late ’80s and early ’90s, however, the recorded music bubble had yet to burst, so there was a much heavier stigma slapped on artists who played for The Man.

The video ends on a parody of RCA’s signature dog-and-gramophone logo, not coincidentally Eric Clapton’s label (poor Slowhand, he just couldn’t catch a break). This wasn’t the first time Young beefed with a label – he was infamously sued by his ’80s label Geffen for making “unrepresentative” albums during his experimental phase. The crazy thing is this is a common stipulation in big record contracts. The label can refuse to put out a record (or sue its own artists) if it doesn’t meet certain standards, the main one being that it’s “commercially satisfactory.” Young has always been a my-way-or-the-highway musician who refuses to compromise morally (see his recent projects Pono and “Who’s Gonna Stand Up?”), but righteous indignation aside, what a great song!

-Kelsey Butterworth

NEW TRACKS: Hanni El Khatib - “Moonlight”

Hanni El Khatib just released his single “Moonlight” off of his upcoming, third album. While his first two albums are a little grittier, I love that “Moonlight” captures the same deep bass line as previous songs and keeps up a solid psychedelic riff. The transition is clear as El Khatib’s sound continues to evolve, dabbling with a more soulful chorus. El Khatib’s sophomore album, Head in the Dirt, was recorded in Nashville at Dan Auerbach’s studio. The Black Keys’ influence is strong, but now El Khatib is back to his L.A. studio to add some experimental sounds that you won’t hear from his previous ventures. “Moonlight” is bringing garage rock to a whole new level and igniting what is sure to be an amalgam of new sounds on the album, to be released in January 2015.

-Lauren Rosalanko

INTERVIEW: Julian Casablancas

Alec Moss, Half Past contributor and Music Director of WXJM (James Madison University’s only student-run radio station), spoke with Julian Casablancas (lead singer of the Strokes) on Tuesday afternoon. They discussed Julian’s new band, Julian Casablancas + The Voidz, their debut album, Tyranny, as well as their upcoming show at 9:30 Club.

See Julian Casablancas + TheVoidz tomorrow, October 17 at 9:30 Club!

JUST ANNOUNCED: I.M.P. Presents the incredible Sam Smith at Patriot Center on 1/12/15! Tickets on sale 10/24 at 10am. 

JOE’S JAZZY JAUNTS: Bill Frisell - Guitar in the Space Age!

Whereas other guitarists may value pyrotechnics, Bill Frisell puts a premium on patience. Regardless of the style, the man seems reluctant to play any note that does not have an integral role in the mood he’s constructing. On Guitar in the Space Age!, released earlier this year, he applies this approach to a variety of sounds, most retro in nature. His personal brand of Americana is present, though a significant amount of material is borrowed from different sources.

Like a good storyteller, Frisell provides some introductory detail before launching into the main material. On the opening track “Pipeline,” by surf-rockers The Chantays, this comes in the form of ethereal atmospherics. Frisell creates a gentle hum, and then augments it with reverb-laden chords and harmonics. The boldly plucked melody comes in over this, before taking a turn into another wash of sound, this time with a vaguely Spanish inflection.

“Turn, Turn, Turn” enters with a stronger initial statement, staking its place with a jangly stop-start figure. It’s actually a cover of a cover - first written by Pete Seeger in the ‘50s then further popularized by The Byrds in 1965. Frisell takes his cues from the ‘60s pop version, reproducing the feel of the rhythm section. He also effectively translates the vocal line, employing his sweet and sensitive guitar tone.

A few tracks later the Beach Boys arrive, in the form of a rendition of 1963’s “Surfer Girl.” The song’s relaxed pace suits Frisell, as he is able to lightly to pick out the theme, adding carefully planned digressions and hesitations. Along with supporting guitarist Greg Leisz, he creates a lush soundscape, which conveys what it needs to without breaking its state of calm.

Frisell occasionally gets loud, as on his version of Link Wray’s “Rumble.” Wray was one of the early pioneers of guitar distortion, poking holes in his amp to achieve the desired effect. Frisell pays tribute, indulging in a bit of bluesy menace. He is still very precise in his playing, although he allows himself a moment of pure noise during the raucous solo.

He also dives into a bit of mild psychedelia on “Tired of Waiting For You,” originally by The Kinks. The song starts in the usual Frisell mode, but crescendos ever so slowly. By the four-minute mark, effects have been added to what was a clean sound, and soaring lines dance around each other. A mini-whirlpool of pitches ensues, swirling frantically for a short time before dissolving back into nothing.

The album ends with “Telstar,” appropriate for the space age theme as it was named for a satellite. The song was originally recorded by The Tornados, and notably featured an early electronic keyboard called a clavioline. Frisell doesn’t try to imitate that instrument’s eerie timbre, instead offering a more flexible and joyful take on the main line. Like the majority of the music here, it’s not especially complex, but finds its depth in the richness of the texture and the strength of the melody.

-Joe Ciccarello

ALBUM REVIEW: Weezer - Everything Will Be Alright In The End

Weezer has been plagued since their 2001 return with fans and critics comparing each successive release to their explosive self-titled debut and Pinkerton, which is on basically every modern alt rock and emo band’s “Most Life-Changing Albums Ever” list. Green was too simple (“The band isn’t the same without Matt Sharp”); Maladroit too confusing (“What happened to singing about emotions?”); Make Believe through Raditude poppier than the last (“Why is there a talk-box solo on a Weezer album?”). With their new offering, Everything WIll Be Alright in the End, Vars and Co. decided to partially listen to their critics: instead of trying to create a repeat of Blue and Pink like critics would want, the band set out to create an album at the same quality level. This meant the second longest break in between releases in band history and the creation of countless demos - including many fallen soldiers that’ll hopefully see the light of day. In the end, everything was not only alright, but fantastic.

For the first time in quite a while, Weezer’s released an album that features no filler tracks. Top to bottom, all these tracks are fantastic - although I personally could care less for lead single “Back to the Shack” and the whistle pop of “Da Vinci.” Rivers experiments with some new song structure techniques on “Lonely Girl” and the closing, almost-fully-instrumental three tracks, and the standout track “Cleopatra” even utilizes 5/4 measures in its chorus. Yes, that’s a potential single that features irregular meter. We are certainly living in the future. 

The writing is back on point. “I’ve Had It Up to Here” skillfully throws off the shackles of critics and the mass-consumerism of modern pop, while the heartfelt “Foolish Father” represents the mythical “grown-up Pinkerton” for which many fans have been clamoring. (Don’t be putt off by the collaboration credits in the liner notes; unlike in the past, these ones make sense, like bringing in some of the guys from disciple band Ozma instead of, say, Lil Wayne. And, no, I’m not going to link to that collab. Ever.) The solos are great, especially those Rivers shares with Brian Bell. The rhythm section produces their best work in a decade. The album has a clean polish but hard-rocking finish thanks to returning producer Ric Ocasek of The Cars.

My top picks from the album:

  • “Cleopatra” - There’s harmonica, harmony, and 5/4 measures. What’s not to like?
  • “Foolish Father” - Brought about by the clarity of now being a father himself, Rivers penned an emotional opus considering his own absent father.
  • “The Waste Land / Anonymous / Return to Ithaka” - Scott Shriner will finally be able to bust out his double-necked combo guitar/bass to help recreate a devastating live rendition of the transcendental ecstasy of these companion tracks.

-Ryan Larget, Resident Weezer Scholar

9:30 Interview: The Wild Feathers
Nashville’s Wild Feathers create a unique blend of folk, rock, and blues. I had the opportunity to ask Rick, the guitarist/vocalist, some questions about being a part of Wild Feathers. You can listen to full audio of the interview here.
Sydney [9:30]: My name is Sydney, I’m with the 9:30 Club.  I write for their blog, and I have a couple questions for you!
Rick [The Wild Feathers]: Alright! Let’s go!
So, with this new tour, how does this tour differ from other tours that you have done in the past?
Well, it’s our second headlining tour this year, and our second one total in our careers, headlining by ourselves, so we’re excited about that. We’ve been a support band for what seems like hundreds of tours, so we know how to open up for other bands but we learned last time how to be the headliner and do certain things. For example, you have a lot longer to play so you get a little more freedom, so we’re excited to do that. 

Is there anything significantly different in how you put on a show when you’re opening versus when you’re headlining?

Yeah, I think so because when you headline the show, the majority of the people are there to see you. It’s your show. So there’s already that connection that people seem to be more excited to see you because they’ve already heard of you and they’re a fan, as opposed to when you’re opening for a band and they’re audience might not have ever heard of you before. In that case you have to try and instill a lot of energy and win them over, which is fun too. But headlining, like I said, the majority of who you’re playing for are your fans.  They’re excited to see you, and you’re excited to see them, and you share in their energy together, which is really great.
So, I know that you guys formed a while ago, but why did you guys start making music—why did you start this band in the first place?

I think that Joel, Taylor, and I were all kind of in the same boat, we just didn’t know it at the time. We were all ready to try something different, but we all came from different backgrounds doing different solo projects, and we all thought, “why not attempt something like this and see what could happen?” And then we really enjoyed it and things started moving along pretty quickly. We felt like we had something positive going, which is great, and we are still rally enjoying it. We’re still on our first record cycle, which is nice, and we’ve been writing here and there for our next record, which is exciting. Overall, we are still really enjoying it.

Awesome! So, I know that you guys rotate singers and how you play the songs, so what challenges does that present that makes The Wild Feathers unique compared to other bands?

I think for a while when we were just starting, the challenge was just adjusting to not being the only one who calls all the shots, and that still can be kind of trying. With our background, we all come from being the sole leader, calling the shots and directing everything. With this band, it’s more of a democracy, and we discuss everything and rely on each other to make smarter decisions, which is great. That was a little challenging at first, but it just took some getting used to. It’s not so much as challenging anymore. And that’s really kind of it. Well, It’s challenging to write sometimes. There are, besides myself, two other songwriters in the band who are very passionate about what they do. We never get argumentative or anything, but people get excited and it can be hard to focus the actual song, the actual thoughts, because we’re so excited. It’s challenging to kind of reign it in, but that’s really it.

So you guys are going to be playing at the 9:30 Club in DC coming up, and I know you guys have come to DC before, but is there anything new that you’re looking forward to doing or a place you’re excited to go back to when you’re here?

Well, we always love being there, but it seems like every time we’re in DC we’re there for a total of like four or five hours. We come in, sound check, play, and then have to leave, but I think we get a full night there. So, I’m willing to say that’s one of our favorite venues in the country, just like every other band. It’s amazing, it sounds great, and the people are so nice. We sure will be doing some celebrating on the town. It will be so nice coming back and being the headliner, not just the opener.

The last question I have for you is: if your tour bus was on fire, or about to fall into a lake or something, but you had time to run in and grab one thing out of the bus, what would you grab?

Are we deep into the tour; deep into traveling?
Yes.
I would probably say my phone charger.  

That’s a good answer!

That’s the first thing that came to my mind. I have to communicate. I would say my music, but most of my music on the road is on my phone, so I would have to say my phone charger. 



Well, is there anything else that you would like to add?

Not really. We are super excited to come back to DC and play 9:30. Can’t wait for the cupcakes, can’t wait to have a good time like we always do. 

Thank you so much for your time!

Thank you! No problem! See you soon!
-Sydney Sanial
Be sure to catch The Wild Feathers when they play at the 9:30 club on Thursday, 11/20

9:30 Interview: The Wild Feathers

Nashville’s Wild Feathers create a unique blend of folk, rock, and blues. I had the opportunity to ask Rick, the guitarist/vocalist, some questions about being a part of Wild Feathers. You can listen to full audio of the interview here.

Sydney [9:30]: My name is Sydney, I’m with the 9:30 Club.  I write for their blog, and I have a couple questions for you!

Rick [The Wild Feathers]: Alright! Let’s go!

So, with this new tour, how does this tour differ from other tours that you have done in the past?

Well, it’s our second headlining tour this year, and our second one total in our careers, headlining by ourselves, so we’re excited about that. We’ve been a support band for what seems like hundreds of tours, so we know how to open up for other bands but we learned last time how to be the headliner and do certain things. For example, you have a lot longer to play so you get a little more freedom, so we’re excited to do that. 

Is there anything significantly different in how you put on a show when you’re opening versus when you’re headlining?

Yeah, I think so because when you headline the show, the majority of the people are there to see you. It’s your show. So there’s already that connection that people seem to be more excited to see you because they’ve already heard of you and they’re a fan, as opposed to when you’re opening for a band and they’re audience might not have ever heard of you before. In that case you have to try and instill a lot of energy and win them over, which is fun too. But headlining, like I said, the majority of who you’re playing for are your fans.  They’re excited to see you, and you’re excited to see them, and you share in their energy together, which is really great.

So, I know that you guys formed a while ago, but why did you guys start making music—why did you start this band in the first place?

I think that Joel, Taylor, and I were all kind of in the same boat, we just didn’t know it at the time. We were all ready to try something different, but we all came from different backgrounds doing different solo projects, and we all thought, “why not attempt something like this and see what could happen?” And then we really enjoyed it and things started moving along pretty quickly. We felt like we had something positive going, which is great, and we are still rally enjoying it. We’re still on our first record cycle, which is nice, and we’ve been writing here and there for our next record, which is exciting. Overall, we are still really enjoying it.

Awesome! So, I know that you guys rotate singers and how you play the songs, so what challenges does that present that makes The Wild Feathers unique compared to other bands?

I think for a while when we were just starting, the challenge was just adjusting to not being the only one who calls all the shots, and that still can be kind of trying. With our background, we all come from being the sole leader, calling the shots and directing everything. With this band, it’s more of a democracy, and we discuss everything and rely on each other to make smarter decisions, which is great. That was a little challenging at first, but it just took some getting used to. It’s not so much as challenging anymore. And that’s really kind of it. Well, It’s challenging to write sometimes. There are, besides myself, two other songwriters in the band who are very passionate about what they do. We never get argumentative or anything, but people get excited and it can be hard to focus the actual song, the actual thoughts, because we’re so excited. It’s challenging to kind of reign it in, but that’s really it.

So you guys are going to be playing at the 9:30 Club in DC coming up, and I know you guys have come to DC before, but is there anything new that you’re looking forward to doing or a place you’re excited to go back to when you’re here?

Well, we always love being there, but it seems like every time we’re in DC we’re there for a total of like four or five hours. We come in, sound check, play, and then have to leave, but I think we get a full night there. So, I’m willing to say that’s one of our favorite venues in the country, just like every other band. It’s amazing, it sounds great, and the people are so nice. We sure will be doing some celebrating on the town. It will be so nice coming back and being the headliner, not just the opener.

The last question I have for you is: if your tour bus was on fire, or about to fall into a lake or something, but you had time to run in and grab one thing out of the bus, what would you grab?

Are we deep into the tour; deep into traveling?

Yes.

I would probably say my phone charger.  

That’s a good answer!

That’s the first thing that came to my mind. I have to communicate. I would say my music, but most of my music on the road is on my phone, so I would have to say my phone charger. 

Well, is there anything else that you would like to add?

Not really. We are super excited to come back to DC and play 9:30. Can’t wait for the cupcakes, can’t wait to have a good time like we always do. 

Thank you so much for your time!

Thank you! No problem! See you soon!

-Sydney Sanial

Be sure to catch The Wild Feathers when they play at the 9:30 club on Thursday, 11/20

THIS ONE TIME AT BANDCAMP: Volume 13

This week’s theme is, ironically, a lack of theme. Sometimes themes are great and other times they are like a brand new pair of skinny jeans: tight, restricting, and uncomfortable. I’m letting my creativity run free this week, picking bands from different genres and backgrounds, but all equally as great and deserving of your attention.

The Splits by The Splits

The Splits: The Splits actually hail from Helsinki, Finland and slay all competitors in the female-led shoegazey garage rock market. Every note packs a punch in a way that makes you want to jump in place and sing along. I’ve never seen The Splits, but I get the feeling they’re a couple babes in leather jackets who will dominate any stage until the whole room is dancing along. None of their songs even reach the three-minute mark, so it’s perfect listen for those with a short attention span in an oh-so-punk fashion.
RIYL: Bikini Kill (or any other riot grrrl bands).
Favorite Track: “No Way Out”
Witch Coast for President by witch coast 

Witch Coast: DC natives Witch Coast like to take lo-fi to a new (lower?) level. It almost sounds like they took their already lo-fi recording and then re-recorded it playing out the speakers of my ’96 Corolla, and I love every moment of it. The overall fuzzy, lo-fi sound gives a shoegaze feel while the heavy guitar and drums do wonderous things for the greater post-punk community. I feel like if This One Time at Bandcamp alums Wakes  and TELE/VISIONS had a music baby, it would probably sound something like Witch Coast.
RIYL: Eagulls, Cheatahs
Favorite Track: “Dopesick”
When the Sangria Dies by Rupert Angeleyes

Rupert Angeleyes: If you’re a highly lyrical listener, Rupert Angeleyes has something for you. Unlike a lot of the fuzzy, lo-fi music typical of bandcamp recordings, Rupert Angeleyes’ vocals are incredibly understandable, telling stories of relatable scenarios in a sultry croon. The backing lies somewhere across and between surfy psychedelic electronica that secretly makes you want to bob along in that awkward bouncy sway that seems to be the only way to move along to music like this. But no matter how ridiculous you may look, it is undeniable that Rupert Angeleyes is clever and talented.
RIYL: Mac DeMarco, Foxygen
Favorite Track: “When the Sangria Dies”
-Sydney Sanial  

Have suggestions or submissions for the next article? I love those! Send them to sydneysanial@gmail.com.

Listen tonight and every Wednesday night/Thursday morning from Midnight to 1am to This One Time at Bandcamp radio on WMUC Digital to hear these and other great Bandcamp bands!

THIS ONE TIME AT BANDCAMP: Volume 13

This week’s theme is, ironically, a lack of theme. Sometimes themes are great and other times they are like a brand new pair of skinny jeans: tight, restricting, and uncomfortable. I’m letting my creativity run free this week, picking bands from different genres and backgrounds, but all equally as great and deserving of your attention.

The Splits: The Splits actually hail from Helsinki, Finland and slay all competitors in the female-led shoegazey garage rock market. Every note packs a punch in a way that makes you want to jump in place and sing along. I’ve never seen The Splits, but I get the feeling they’re a couple babes in leather jackets who will dominate any stage until the whole room is dancing along. None of their songs even reach the three-minute mark, so it’s perfect listen for those with a short attention span in an oh-so-punk fashion.

  • RIYL: Bikini Kill (or any other riot grrrl bands).
  • Favorite Track: “No Way Out”

Witch Coast: DC natives Witch Coast like to take lo-fi to a new (lower?) level. It almost sounds like they took their already lo-fi recording and then re-recorded it playing out the speakers of my ’96 Corolla, and I love every moment of it. The overall fuzzy, lo-fi sound gives a shoegaze feel while the heavy guitar and drums do wonderous things for the greater post-punk community. I feel like if This One Time at Bandcamp alums Wakes and TELE/VISIONS had a music baby, it would probably sound something like Witch Coast.

  • RIYL: Eagulls, Cheatahs
  • Favorite Track: “Dopesick”

Rupert Angeleyes: If you’re a highly lyrical listener, Rupert Angeleyes has something for you. Unlike a lot of the fuzzy, lo-fi music typical of bandcamp recordings, Rupert Angeleyes’ vocals are incredibly understandable, telling stories of relatable scenarios in a sultry croon. The backing lies somewhere across and between surfy psychedelic electronica that secretly makes you want to bob along in that awkward bouncy sway that seems to be the only way to move along to music like this. But no matter how ridiculous you may look, it is undeniable that Rupert Angeleyes is clever and talented.

  • RIYL: Mac DeMarco, Foxygen
  • Favorite Track: “When the Sangria Dies”

-Sydney Sanial

Have suggestions or submissions for the next article? I love those! Send them to sydneysanial@gmail.com.

Listen tonight and every Wednesday night/Thursday morning from Midnight to 1am to This One Time at Bandcamp radio on WMUC Digital to hear these and other great Bandcamp bands!